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Shut up, quit and go home.

I observe the house [House of Representatives] is endeavoring to remedy the eternal protraction [prolonging] of debate by setting up all night … I have thought that such a Rule as the following would be more effectual & less inconvenient. ‘Resolved that at [VIII.] aclock in the evening (whenever the house shall be in session at that hour) it shall be the duty of the Speaker to declare that hour arrived, whereupon all debate shall cease.”
To John Wayles Eppes, January 17, 1810

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Effective leaders understand the value of a deadline.
A previous post from this letter complained about long-winded speeches in the House, and the ill effects they had on its members and the public. Here, Jefferson observed that Congress was trying to deal with the problem by letting the debate go into the wee hours of the morning, wearying everyone involved. He offered a solution.

Why not have the House agree in advance to end all debate at a designated hour? He suggested a mechanism for disposing of whatever was being considered at that moment, and then they could adjourn and go home for the day.

Jefferson asked his former son-in-law to use his idea in any way he could, but not to reveal him as the source of the suggestion.

The House of Representatives did not change its ways.

“Thanks for making our convention a big success.”
Central Bank
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Would you just shut up?

I observe that the H. of R. [House of Representataives] are sensible of the ill effect of the long speeches in their house on their proceedings. but they have a worse effect in the disgust they excite among the people …these speeches therefore are less & less read, and if continued will cease to be read at all …
To John Wayles Eppes, January 17, 1810

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Leaders who talk too much undermine themselves and disgust others.
Eppes (1773-1823), Jefferson’s former son-in-law, was a member of the House. The two men corresponded often on political matters. Here, Jefferson noted the long speeches given in Congress House members were starting to burden House members.

Worse yet, their long-windedness was wearying the citizens. (Speeches were sometimes printed in local newspapers.) Public irritation was evident, because fewer people were reading those speeches. If the trend continued, they wouldn’t be read at all.

Jefferson depended on a literate, well-read and engaged citizenry to safeguard the republic. Congress was driving people away and thus undermining the government.

“Mr. Lee was a principal speaker for the 2004 Executive Forum…
His ability to think, adapt, and accept the prescribed role … was outstanding.”
Executive Director, Greater St. Louis Federal Executive Board
Mr. Jefferson’s presentation for your audience will be outstanding, too!
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I would rather not fight but WILL if you force me!

When I saw you at court I requested you would not meddle with any grounds without the 8. fields of Shadwell till we should settle our difference as to Lego. yet in my ride to-day I percieve you have ploughed a considerable piece of ground outside of those fields. if we cannot settle this question between ourselves, or by disinterested neighbors, I shall not decline the umpirage of the law, although an amicable one would be more acceptable. indeed it would be very contrary to my wishes that force should be introduced between you & me, yet I must say that I will not let my property be taken without any consent on my part. I must therefore declare that if you enter on the tract of Lego for the purpose of cultivation before we settle our question, I shall consider it as an act of force, and will meet it with force.
To Eli Alexander, January 17, 1810

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Even the most patient leaders can be pushed too far.
Shadwell was the plantation near Monticello where Jefferson was born. Lego plantation  adjoined Shadwell. Jefferson had leased parts of Shadwell to Alexander. That written lease also allowed for limited farming on Lego under very specific conditions. Alexander had not met his obligations at Shadwell and had encroached on Lego.

The two men had met face-to-face about the issue. Jefferson had also written Alexander the month before, reminding him of the lease terms and itemizing the infractions. In what appeared to be a generous gesture, Jefferson offered very favorable terms if Alexander would only do what he had already agreed. If not, he would seek arbitration.

A horse ride of this date proved that Alexander had ignored their conversation and Jefferson’s follow-up letter. The latter still wanted a peaceful accommodation, but he would not let his lands be sued without permission. If that meant going to court, which Jefferson hated, so be it.

Jefferson’s bark was worse than his bite. A review of all the correspondence between these men, including the last letter from Jefferson three years later, indicates he was still trying to get some measure of satisfaction from his careless tenant.

“The members … enjoyed your unique representation of Thomas Jefferson …
Thank you …”
President, Missouri Association for Adult Continuing and Community Education
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Even if I have it, I will not give it to you.

Your letter of Dec. 10. is safely recieved … I have not examined my papers to see if I have the letter … which you ask for. I have no recollection whether I recieved such a letter. but it is not on that ground I decline looking for & communicating it. besides the general principles of law & reason which render correspondences even between private individuals sacredly secret, in my late official station [as President] they are peculiarly so … I have therefore regularly declined all communications of letters sent to me in order that they might be used against the writer: and I trust so much in your candor & good sense as to believe you will, on reflection, think I am right in so doing …
To Elias Glover, January 13, 1810

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Wise leaders understand the importance of maintaining confidentiality.
Glover had requested a copy of a letter written by another to Jefferson, thinking that letter might provide vindication for a charge made against him. If Jefferson didn’t have that letter, Glover asked where else he might find a copy. The former President declined both requests. While he didn’t recall the letter, he didn’t even bother to look. (Jefferson had a very good filing and retrieval system!)

By both nature and common sense, correspondence between individuals was private. Eight years as President had reinforced that belief, especially when the one requesting the correspondence might use it against the original writer.

“Your well-researched portrayals of President Thomas Jefferson
and Captain William Clark were highlights of the five-day event.”
Director, Prairieland Chatauqua, Illinois
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I do NOT want to go to court with you!

… litigation has ever been to me the most painful business I could be engaged in. to this has been owing some of the delays in the present case. the discussion however in this case has been attempered [blended with] by candor & friendship. and by the honest and mutual desire of seeking nothing but what is right. that this spirit animated your father, his letters on this subject, as well as his character prove. that it is equally yours, I feel as entire confidence as I have a knolege that my own wishes have no other object. in this spirit I tender you the assurances of my esteem & respect.
To John Harvie, December 28, 1809

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Consensus leaders choose loss rather than confrontation.
The Harvies were long-standing family friends. One John Harvie was guardian for Jefferson when he was a fatherless teenager. That Harvie’s son, also named John, was a contemporary of Jefferson’s. This John Harvie was the grandson, who had inherited a competing claim for land Jefferson believed was rightly his, acquired more than 30 years before. Each man asserted an undeniable claim to the land in question.

Jefferson hated confrontation, even with his political foes. He especially disliked it when it involved friends. Twice, Jefferson unsuccessfully sought arbitration to settle the matter. This John Harvie agreed to arbitration without conceding any claim to the land. Jefferson made these points:
1. Contending in court was the “most painful business” he knew.
2. He admitted delaying settlement in dread of that confrontation.
3. Both men had been straightforward and wanted “what is right,” even though they disagreed on what “right” was.
4. Harvie’s father was an honorable man, and surely the son would be, also.
5. That spirit would enable them to settle the matter equitably.

Two months later, they agreed to divide the land’s valuable equally. Each man, though firmly believing himself entitled to the whole thing, chose half a loaf instead out of respect for the other and the desire to avoid a fight.

“I want to compliment the MBA [Missouri Bankers Association] and Patrick Lee
for the excellent presentation he made as Thomas Jefferson …”
President and CEO, Citizens National Bank
Mr. Jefferson will make an excellent presentation for your audience!
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To promise what I cannot deliver is immoral.

I have considered your proposition of yesterday to endorse a bill of 500.D. [co-sign a loan] … it would be immoral for me to engage to pay 500.D. in 60 days on your failure to do it, when I know that it would be out of my power. it may be said indeed that you will not fail. I am sure you do not mean nor expect to fail in doing it. but circumstances not under your controul may put it out of your power, just as similar circumstances now embarrass your paiments to me. but for me deliberately to engage to do a thing in any event which I know it will be out of my power to do, is irreconcileable to my ideas of right.
To Jonathan Shoemaker, December 26, 2017

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Honest leaders should say no when no is all they can offer.
We have met Mr. Shoemaker before. He had leased Jefferson’s wheat-grinding mill, turned it over to his negligent sons, and had paid none of the agreed-to rent. In continuing distress, he now wanted Jefferson to co-sign a $500 loan for him. Jefferson was short of funds himself. He was in no position to guarantee Shoemaker’s loan.

Shoemaker assured Jefferson he was good for the money. Jefferson knew otherwise, since the other man was already delinquent in payments to him.

Co-signing loans was a common practice. Jefferson claimed the moral high ground with Shoemaker. He should have done the same thing in 1818, but for honor could not, when Cary Nicholas, his wealthy friend and father-in-law of his grandson Jeff, asked him to co-sign his $20,000 note. Nicholas lost everything in the economic panic the next year. The additional debt was the death blow for Jefferson’s already-precarious finances.

“In addition to your great portrayal … a lot of our folks commented
that they enjoyed seeing you at the reception … That went over really well.”
VP-Operations, Association of Illinois Electric Cooperatives
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Climate change, 19th century style

… the change which has taken place in our climate is one of those facts which all men of years are sensible of … I remember that when I was a small boy (say 60. years ago) snows were frequent and deep in every winter; to my knee very often, to my waist sometimes … and I remember, while yet young, to have heard from very old men that, in their youth, the winters had been still colder, with deeper & longer snows. in the year 1772. (37. years ago) we had a snow 2. feet deep in the Champain [level, open]parts of this state, & 3. feet in the counties next below the mountains. that year is still marked in conversation by the designation of ‘the year of the deep snow.
To Nathaniel Chapman, December 11, 1809

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Honest leaders admit when they can’t deliver.
The physician Chapman asked Jefferson’s help in documenting climate change. Jefferson had little to offer beyond personal recollection and a weather diary he kept in Washington City.

That recollection was of colder winters and heavier snowfall in his youth. When he was 29 (in 1772), snow ranged from 2 to 3 feet across Virginia. As President, he documented seven years’ annual snowfall in the nation’s capital from 4.5″ to 21″, the average being 14.5″.

Though lacking empirical data to help Chapman, his personal experience was of noticeably warmer winters over the course of a lifetime. He apologized for not being more able to help a fellow scientist.

… thanks for your excellent program…
I received nothing but compliments for your presentation as Thomas Jefferson.”
Past President, Cole County Historical Society
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Trapping, hunting and ABCs

Francis has enjoyed constant & perfect health, and is as happy as the day is long. he has had little success as yet with either his traps, or bow & arrows. he is now engaged in a literary contest with his cousin Virginia, both having begun to write together. as soon as he gets to z (being now only at h) he promises you a letter.
To John Wayles Eppes, December 8, 1809

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Grandfather leaders know both indoor and outdoor education is necessary!
Jefferson reported to his widowed son-in-law (married to his daughter Maria, who died in 1804) on the safe arrival of his 8-year-old son Francis at Monticello. In a time when health and life could vanish in an instant, he reassured the father that his son was both healthy and happy.

Jefferson treasured a multi-faceted education. Chances are he was helping his grandson with both outdoor and indoor skills. Francis’ hunting and trapping prowess needed some work, but his indoor education was coming along. Competing with his 8-year-old cousin, both were learning how to write their letters. Francis was up to the letter H. His father could expect a letter when he got to Z. (Maybe he would have some hunting success to report on by then?)

“Thank you again for an enjoyable, entertaining, and educational time warp.”
District Manager, Break Time Convenience Stores
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Old McDonald had a farm. Part 2 of 2

… whenever the Indians come to Detroit on trade or other business, they encamp on or about this farm. this would give them opportunities of seeing their sons & daughters, & their advancement in the useful arts, of seeing & learning from example all the operations & process of a farm, and of always carrying home themselves some additional knolege of these things … & losing by degrees all other dependance for subsistence, they would deprecate [disapprove of] war with us as bringing certain destruction on their property, and would become a barrier for that distant & insulated post against the Indians beyond them.
To President James Madison, December 7, 1809

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Wise leaders use every opportunity to teach.
The first post from this letter outlined Jefferson’s vision to use a government-owned farm near Detroit as a school for Indian girls and boys. The girls were to learn household arts, the boys farming. Both were to be taught to read and write.
A second purpose for this farm/school was to be an object lesson for other Indians. They were to camp on or near this farm when they came to Detroit. In doing so, they would see the advantages enjoyed by their children and take that knowledge home with them. In time, that knowledge would:
1. Help them be self-supporting on their own land
2. Lead them to give up warfare which could only end in their destruction
3. Become an object lesson themselves for tribes that lived further west and be a protective barrier for whites who lived to the east

“Your well-organized and well-researched approach
certainly enhanced our evening …”

Director, The Leadership Academy, Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
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Old McDonald had a farm. Part 1 of 2

On this farm we proposed to assemble the following establishments.
1. [a school for] … the care & instruction of Indian girls in carding, spinning, weaving, sewing, & the other houshold arts … [and] reading & writing … & that the benefits of the Institution should be extended to the boys also of the neighboring tribes, who were to be lodged, fed, & instructed there.
2. To establish there the farmer at present employed by the US to instruct those Indians in the use of the plough & other implements & practises of Agriculture, & in the general management of the farm … reading & writing were to be a secondary object.
3. To remove thither the Carpenter & Smith at present employed by the US. among the same Indians; with whom such of the boys as had a turn for it should work & learn their trades.
To President James Madison, December 7, 1809

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Wise leaders know education is the only path to lasting self-improvement.
This letter dealt with the government’s purchase of a farm just outside Detroit, a process begun at the very end of Jefferson’s Presidency, and what use should be made of it. He proposed three:
1. To educate Indian girls in “household arts” as well as reading and writing. Room, board and instruction were to be offered nearby Indian boys.
2. A U.S. employed farmer was to teach those boys farming and farm management.
3. The carpenter and blacksmith employed by the U.S. were to be removed and replaced with Indian boys who showed aptitude for those trades.

Young people learning practical arts for the household or farm, coupled with literacy, held the most promise for a different life, and a better one Jefferson believed, for native people.

“Your opening keynote presentation
had the audience spellbound …”
Program Chair, Missouri Organization for Clinical Laboratory Science
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