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Is your hide thick enough?

you have indeed recieved the federal unction of lying & slandering. but who has not? who will ever again come into eminent office unanointed with this chrism [oil]? it seems to be fixed that falsehood & calumny are to be the ordinary engines of opposition: engines which will not be entirely without effect … I certainly have known, & still know, characters eminently qualified for the most exalted trusts, who could not bear up against the brutal beatings & hewings … I may say, from intimate knolege, that we should have lost the services of the greatest character of our country [George Washington] had he been assailed with the degree of abandoned licentiousness now practised.
To James Sullivan, May 21, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Great leaders are lost for fear of public attack.
Sullivan [1744-1808] was the Republican attorney general in Massachusetts and would soon become governor. Jefferson commiserated with him on the “lying & slandering” both had endured, the only weapons in their opponents’ arsenal. Although their accusations were without merit, they still stung.

Some “eminently qualified” individuals avoided public service because of those attacks. Even President Washington, known for his fearlessness, would have abandoned public life had he been subjected to the current level of abuse.

Jefferson was considered thin-skinned but able to heed the advice Washington had given him years before, that when attacked, do not respond. He vented to friends in his private correspondence, but publicly, he suffered in silence.

“Mr. Jefferson’s presentation on leadership was a wonderful and unique way
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County Commissioners Association of Pennsylvania
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I will have you arrested.

   Miss Eleanor W. Randolph to Th: Jefferson        D.[ebit]
1805. May 21. To a letter which ought to be written once in every 3. weeks, while I am here, to wit from Jan. 1. 1805. to this day, 15. weeks 5.
Cr.[edit]
Feb. 23. By one single letter of this day’s date               1
Letters Balance due from E. W. Randolph to Th:J.                                                                        4
                                                                                     5

So stands the account for this year, my dear Ellen, between you and me. unless it be soon paid off, I shall send the sheriff after you.
To Ellen W. Randolph, May 21, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Leaders need the encouragement of news from home.
Jefferson prepared a chart indicating that he expected a letter every three weeks from the recipient, for a total of five letters due since the first of the year. So far, he had received only one. The recipient was delinquent four letters and threatened with arrest unless the imbalance was corrected.

Who was the laggard letter-writer? Jefferson’s nine-year old granddaughter. He subsequently lightened the tone, inquiring about the flowers at Monticello, for a report on mumps afflicting the family, and asking her to convey his affection to her parents and siblings.

Being away from Monticello was a sacrifice Jefferson accepted. More correspondence from everyone at home was a frequent request, one never acted upon to his satisfaction.

“… how enthralled our attendees were …
a pleasant and refreshingly different aspect of the overall medical lectures agenda.”
Chairman, FOCUS on Respiratory Care and Sleep Medicine Conference
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What is on your wish list?

I avail myself with thankfulness of the opportunity your kindness offers of procuring certain articles from London, which I have long wanted, and only waited a special opportunity to acquire. you will find a list of them on the next leaf …

Enclosure

Baxter’s history of England. the 8vo. edn would be preferred, if there be one 0-15-0
Combrun on brewing [this is a 4to. vol. published some 40. or 50. years ago, & much desired.] 0-15-0
Adams’s geometrical & graphical essays by Jones. 2. v. 8vo. 0-14-0
Adams’s introdn to practical astronomy or the use of the Quadrants & Equatorials 0-2-6
Arrowsmith’s 4. sheet map of Europe }on linen with rollers &, varnished about
   do Asia
   do Africa
Olmedilla’s map of S. America by Faden. do. 4-14-6
Jones’s New 18 I. British globes with the new discoveries to 1800. in common plain frames of stained wood 7-7-0
with a compass fitted to both the frames of do. 6.
 & a pr of red leather covers 1-4-0
A new portable drawing board & seat (the board folds up for the pocket & the legs formg. a walking stick) 0-18-0
for the 2. last articles see W. & S. Jones’s catalogue No. 30. Lower Holborn. London.
an additional telescope for an Equitorial. see drawg. 2-2-0
4 double turning plates for an Equatl. to stand on see drawg. 0-10-6
19-8-6

To William Tunnicliffe, April 25, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
What occupies leaders’ minds when they’re not leading?
Jefferson placed an order for items “which I have long wanted.” Governing demanded most of his attention, but sometimes he had the hours after dinner (which was at 3:30 pm) for personal interests, most commonly books and science. This wish list included:
1. One book on history and another on brewing (!)
2. Essays on mathematics and astronomy
3. Maps and globes
4. Telescopes
5. A portable drawing board/walking stick. (This may have been the inspiration for a chair/walking stick of his own invention.)

Jefferson estimated the cost at 20 pounds, about $100 then, perhaps $1,400 and $1,800 today. He was already in considerable debt, but that was rarely a consideration when he really wanted something.

“The manner in which you tailored your comments …
made your presentation all the more meaningful to our members.”
Executive Director, Association of Indiana Counties
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2 Comments Posted in Natural history (science), Personal preferences Tagged , , , , , , , |

The brotherhood of good men is blind to nationality.

Th: Jefferson presents his salutations to Mr. Robert Moore & his acknowledgements for the Jerusalem wheat he was so kind as to forward him from his relation in Ireland … the good men of the world form a nation of their own, and when promoting the well-being of others never ask of what country they are. he hopes the US. will shew themselves worthy of these kindnesses. he tenders to mr Moore his respects and best wishes.
To Robert Moore, March 11, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Wise leaders recognize the “nation” of good men worldwide.
Jefferson loved botany and especially species related to food. Of those, he esteemed bread grains most of all, for their potential to nourish the greatest number of people worldwide. Here he conveyed his thanks for the gift of “Jerusalem wheat” forwarded to him by Mr. Moore, who received it from a family member in Ireland.

Jefferson recognized that good men worldwide formed “a nation of their own.” Their motivation was “the well-being of others.” When doing that work, it was never their concern to inquire about the nationality of another. Service to mankind superceded borders.

“Your portrayal of Thomas Jefferson …made a significant contribution …”
Executive Director, Professional Land Surveyors of Ohio, Inc.
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One daughter died. I fear the other will die, too.

… I have had the inexpressible misfortune to lose my younger daughter, who has left me two grandchildren, & my elder one has such poor health, that I have little confidence in her life. she has 6 children. determined as I am to retire at the end of 4 years, I know not if I shall have a family to retire to. I must learn philosophy from you, & seek in a family of plants, that occupation & delight which you have so fortunately found in them …
To Madam de Tesse′, March 10, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
What private fears do our leaders labor under?
de Tesse′ was the aunt of the French hero of the American revolution, Marquis de Lafayette. She was an accomplished woman and became friends with Jefferson during his service in France in the mid-late 1780s. The two shared a strong interest in horticulture, exchanging plants and seeds for years. All the rest of this letter pertained to that subject. At the end came this surprisingly personal and unusual observation.

Jefferson’s daughter Maria died the year before, leaving his firstborn Martha as the only surviving child of the six born to him and his late wife. Martha was well-educated and capable. Her husband was not an emotionally stable man, and the responsibility for managing the family and estate (and some of her father’s estate, Monticello) fell on her. Everything I have read about Martha has given the impression that she inherited her father’s genes for good health and long life. Here, her already grieving father feared for her life, too. Jefferson confided that his love of plants might be the only the only family he had left when his Presidency ended four years hence.

His fears were unfounded. Martha outlived her father and presented him with 12 grandchildren, 11 who survived him.

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Daniel Boone Regional Library
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I love cat videos, but …

he is sure also that mr Rodney can testify to him that unremitting attentions requisite to those matters which duty will not permit him to neglect, render it impossible for him to suffer himself to be drawn off by philosophical subjects, altho’ infinitely more pleasing to his mind. he is now hurrying to get through his business in order to make a short visit to his family.
To Caesar Rodney, March 8, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Effective leaders choose the essential over the pleasurable.
A “mr Copes” had sent the President information “on the theory of Magnetism.”  Jefferson didn’t respond directly but, writing in the third person, sent his thanks to Copes thru Rodney, a mutual acquaintance.

While matters of science were “infinitely more pleasing to his mind,” the President’s official duties meant he could not indulge all of his intellectual interests. Those would have to wait for retirement four years hence. It was a sacrifice he was willing to make.

“His [Patrick Lee’s] expertise in tailoring his program to your client is very effective.”
Executive Director, Missouri Concrete Association
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1 Comment Posted in Natural history (science)

How do you change minds?

… some are of opinion that attempts at [re]conciliation [with the political opposition] are useless. this is true only as to distinguished leaders who had committed themselves so far that their pride will not permit them to correct themselves. but it is not true as to the mass of those who had been led astray by an honest confidence in the government & by misinformation. the great majority of these has already reconciled itself to us, & the rest are doing so as fast as the natural progress of opinion will permit.
To Thomas Elwyn, March 8, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Realistic leaders know it takes both time and results to change minds.
Elwyn had sent Jefferson a pamphlet on some subject, and the President replied with his thanks. Something in Elwyn’s submission must have dealt with reconciliation between the political parties, a subject much on Jefferson’s mind. He made these observations:

1. Reconciliation of differences is always a worthwhile goal.
2. Too much pride would keep some from ever changing their minds.
3. “honest confidence in the government” had deceived some people.
4. “misinformation” had deceived others.
5. The majority of those “led astray” had changed their minds already.
6. The rest would do so, given enough time to consider the evidence.

“As a meeting planner, it was a pleasure to work with you …”
Director of Member Services, Association of Louisiana Electric Cooperatives
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We need divine help, too.

… I shall need too the favour of that being in whose hands we are: who led our fathers, as Israel of old, from their native land; and planted them in a country flowing with all the necessaries & comforts of life; who has covered our infancy with his providence, & our riper years with his wisdom & power: & to whose goodness I ask you to join in supplications with me, that he will so enlighten the minds of your servants, guide their councils, & prosper their measures, that whatsoever they do shall result in your good, & shall secure to you the peace, friendship, & approbation of all nations.
Second Inaugural Address, March 4, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Wise leaders know man’s help is not enough.
I excerpted several of the opening paragraphs of this major address and skipped ones that followed. The omitted ones dealt with native Americans and the challenges of their assimilation, the abuses printed by some newspapers, a reiteration of the limited, essential purposes of American government, and a plea for forgiveness for errors in his judgment.

This is the conclusion to Jefferson’s address, a plea for divine help. Jefferson rarely refers to that source as God and never as Jesus, yet he recognized and petitioned “that being” who had:
– Led us to a land blessed with abundant resources
– Protected us in “our infancy”
– Gave us wisdom and power as we matured
Jefferson asked his fellow citizens to join him in “supplications” (earnest or humble requests) for wisdom for America’s leaders, that their actions would result in “your good” at home, and peace, friendship and approval abroad.

“Thank you for a very excellent presentation.”
Executive Director, Associated General Contractors of Missouri
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2 Comments Posted in National Prosperity, Religion Tagged , , , , , , , |

Religion is none of our business.

In matters of Religion, I have considered that it’s free exercise is placed by the constitution independant of the powers of the general government. I have therefore undertaken, on no occasion, to prescribe the religious exercises suited to it: but have left them, as the constitution found them, under the direction & discipline of the state or church authorities acknoleged by the several religious societies.
Second Inaugural Address, March 5, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Principled leaders respect firm boundaries on their authority.
Jefferson reiterated a familiar theme, that the Constitution prohibited the federal government’s involvement in religion, either to promote or inhibit its exercise. That authority was left to the states and the churches within them. For that reason, as President, he had proclaimed no national days of prayer, fasting or thanksgiving.

Twenty years before, Jefferson’s ban on state involvement in religion was adopted in Virginia. He claimed that as one of three accomplishments for which he wished to be remembered and had it recorded on his tombstone. He held that government authority extended only to an individual’s actions, not his thoughts or beliefs. That left religious practice entirely to the individual.

“You gave us an excellent program!
… and would highly recommend your presentation to others.”
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Who will stare at us from the other side?

I know that the acquisition of Louisiana has been disapproved by some, from a candid apprehension that the enlargement of our territory would endanger it’s union. but who can limit the extent to which the federative principle may operate effectively? the larger our association, the less will it be shaken by local passions. and in any view, is it not better that the opposite bank of the Missisipi should be settled by our own brethren & children than by strangers of another family? with which should we be most likely to live in harmony and friendly intercourse?
Second Inaugural Address, March 4, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Confident leaders embrace expansion.
Jefferson acknowledged that some feared the purchase of Louisiana would destabilize the country. He thought just the opposite, that a larger union was a protection against strong local disagreements. He also thought the republican (small r) principles that guided 15 states could guide 20 or 30 or 100 states.

Regardless of one’s opinion on the size of the union, who would be better neighbors on the west side of the Mississippi River? Would they prefer French, Spanish, English or Russian neighbors, for all four countries had interests beyond the Mississippi? Or would they rather have fellow citizens, Americans, as their neighbors?

“Mr. Patrick Lee did a wonderful job portraying Thomas Jefferson …”
Executive Director, Missouri Independent Bankers Association
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