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Are you liberal? Why or why not?

I am in all cases for liberal [straight-forward, open-minded, even-handed, reciprocal] conduct towards other nations, believing that the practice of the same friendly feelings & generous dispositions which attach individuals in private life will attach societies on the large scale, which are composed of individuals.
… the thermometer is at 29°. with us this morning. the peach trees in blossom for a week past.
To Albert Gallatin, March 28, 1803

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Wise leaders use the Golden Rule, with nations as with individuals.
The President proposed “liberal” conduct always by America toward other nations. That conduct could only come from the individuals comprising America. We should not be liberal with one another, and il-liberal with other nations. Nations are comprised of individuals. Our relationships with other nations will be a reflection of how we treat one another.

This letter to his Treasury Secretary covered diplomacy, the navy, Pennsylvania politics and patronage. Gallatin was also his friend, so he ended with a personal observation about the weather and his peach trees. (Perhaps a subsequent letter will make mention of the year’s peach crop being lost to the freezing weather?)

“Patrick Lee has presented three times at our Annual Conference …
Our members have given Mr. Lee standing ovations,
an honor awarded to very few presenters.”
Assistant Executive Director, Pennsylvania Society of Land Surveyors
Mr. Jefferson will impress your audience!
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One Response to Are you liberal? Why or why not?

  1. It is unfortunate that the word “Liberal” got high jacked to a different meaning in politics. In the 1930s Will Rogers used the word liberal in the same vein as Jefferson. Today we have to use the words that you put in brackets above to mean the same thing.

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