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What to do with an excellent workman, now a drunk?

William Stewart, a smith who has lived with me at Monticello some years … is one of the first workmen in America, but within these 6. months has taken to drink … abandoned his family … he writes me word he will return, & desires me to send him 20. D. to bear his expences back … [this] would only enable him to continue his dissipations. I … [enclose] that sum to you … [as] charity for his family of asking the favor of you to encourage him to return to them, to pay his passage … & give him in money his reasonable expences on the road … if he has more it will only enable him to drink & stop by the way. when he arrives here I shall take other measures to forward him. he is become so unfit for any purposes of mine, that my only anxiety now is on account of his family …
To Jones & Howell, November 22, 1803

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Humane leaders demonstrate concern for employees’ families.
Stewart, a gifted craftsman in Jefferson’s long-term employ, began drinking, abandoned his family and vowed never to return. He had a change of heart and wrote his patron from Philadelphia, asking for $20 to get back to Monticello.

Cash-in-hand would only enable Stewart to drink. Instead, and only out of concern for Stewart’s family, he sent the amount requested to trusted businessmen in Philadelphia, asking them to encourage Stewart’s return. They were to purchase his passage home and give him only what he’d need for food and lodging on the three day journey, no “more than 2. or 3. dollars a day.”

Jefferson had no use for the Stewart upon his return but was greatly concerned for his family, “consisting of a very excellent wife & several children.”

“I do hope the opportunity presents itself to work with you again …”
Conference Coordinator, Iowa League of Cities
Thomas Jefferson makes a most favorable impression!
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Leave a comment Posted in Family matters, Human nature, Miscellaneous, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , , , , |

Two million bucks oughtta be enough.

Congress having passed the two million bill, you will recieve by this mail your last dispatches. others will follow you about the 2d. week of April … Congress has [also] given authority for exploring the Missisipi, which however is ordered to be secret. this will employ about 10. persons two years.
To James Monroe, February 25, 1803

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Effective leaders know that diplomacy sometimes requires a lot of money.
Uncharacteristic for him, Jefferson had commanded Monroe to go to France to help negotiate America’s right to freely use the port of New Orleans. That was the easy part. The diplomats needed money to go where their mouths were, so he asked Congress for $2,000,000, and they approved it. The money was to buy New Orleans along with East and West Florida (our present state of Florida, the southern parts of Alabama and Mississippi, and southeastern Louisiana). This was several months before France’s bombshell offer to sell all of Louisiana.

He also informed Monroe of Congress’ authorization of a small company for “exploring the Missisipi” and $2,500 to pay for it. Both actions were being kept from public knowledge.

Jefferson may have been withholding information from Monroe, too, or protecting his mission should the letter become public. The $2,500 was not for exploring the Mississippi River but the Missouri. That river was still owned by Spain, which had already rebuffed Jefferson’s request to explore it.

“I’m sure your presentation appeals to a wide range of Americans …
I would highly recommend it …”
Executive Director, Wisconsin Society of Land Surveyors
Mr. Jefferson & his compatriots, Daniel Boone and William Clark, come highly recommended.
Invite them to speak. Call 573-657-2739
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I do not need or want power.

I have no pleasure in the exercise of power … to fortify the principles of free government, to fence them by every barrier practicable, and to establish in the government habits of economy, present the principal means by which I can render any permanent service: and if the pursuit of these should be found to acquire popularity, the love of popularity may induce some of those who come after me to practise what their natural dispositions might not otherwise lead them to.
To Timothy Bloodworth, December 31, 1802

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Not all strong leaders desire that role.
The only Presidential authority Jefferson cared to exercise had these goals, to:
1. Strengthen the principles of free government
2. Limit government’s reach in every practical way
3. Make frugality in government spending a habit

Any success in these areas would be the permanent legacy he wanted. If his vision of limited government proved popular, perhaps future leaders would continue the trend, even if their personal interests were more expansive.

Historian Jon Meacham won a Pulitzer Prize for his 2012 biography, Thomas Jefferson – The Art of Power takes a more expansive view of Jefferson and his “exercise of power.” The President said he didn’t like it. Meacham said he did but credits Jefferson with using it very effectively.

“The group did not think you were an actor playing a role … but had become the MAN himself….
You did a marvelous job indeed …”
Program Committee Chair, International Hunter Education Association

Before your audience’s eyes, a costumed man will BECOME Thomas Jefferson.
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Pissing THEM off a little can help US behave.

… nor do I foresee a single question which ought to excite party contention. still every question will excite it, because it is sufficient that we propose a measure, to produce opposition to it from the other party. a little of this is not amiss, as it keeps up a wholesome censorship on our conduct;
To Ephraim Kirby, December 10, 1802

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Shrewd leaders appreciate the value of opposition.
In a previous post, Jefferson wrote that the country was doing so well, there was little to recommend to Congress in his annual report (State of the Union Address as we know it today).  He expressed the same sentiment to Kirby, with nothing on the horizon to divide the republican party.

Yet they were bound to propose something, and it would of necessity cause the Federalist party to rally in opposition. That opposition in turn would keep the republican party on its toes, united in its focus and proper in its conduct.

“The address was fascinating history
and presented with a flair that kept the audience spellbound.”
Region 7 Conference Chair, National Academic Advising Association
How many of your conference speakers will keep your audience spellbound?
Thomas Jefferson will!
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Which profession is better, law or medicine? Part 2 of 2

… [doctors, like lawyers] are also numerous. yet I have remarked that wherever one sets himself down in a good neighborhood, not preoccupied, he secures to himself it’s practice, and, if prudent, is not long in acquiring whereon to retire & live in comfort. the Physician is happy in the attachment of the families in which he practises. all think he has saved some one of them, & he finds himself every where a welcome guest, a home in every house. if, to the consciousness of having saved some lives, he can add that of having at no time, from want of caution, destroyed the boon he was called on to save, he will enjoy in age the happy reflection of not having lived in vain …
To David Campbell, January 28, 1810

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
This lawyer leader preferred medicine over law.
Campbell wanted the President’s advice for his 18-year-old son, Thomas Jefferson Campbell, whether to be a lawyer or doctor. Jefferson began and ended by deferring to the young man’s ability and the father’s direction. In between, he gave his opinion of both professions.

Lawyers did not fare well, but doctors did:
1. The doctor who settled in a community and devoted himself to his practice would earn a good livelihood and retirement.
2. Everyone would believe he had saved lives.
3. He would be welcome everywhere.
4. In addition to saving lives, if no deaths could be attributed to him for lack “of caution,” in old age he could be confident his life had not been in vain.

“Thank you for, yet another, outstanding performance.”
President, Missouri Valley Adult Education Association
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Leave a comment Posted in Education, Lawyers, Uncategorized

Which profession is better, law or medicine? Part 1 of 2

I am sensible of the mark of esteem manifested by the name you have given to your son … you doubt between Law, & Physic [medicine], which profession he shall adopt. his peculiar turn of mind & your own knolege of things will best decide this question. Law is quite overdone. it is fallen to the ground; and a man must have great powers to raise himself in it to either honour or profit. the Mob of the profession get by it as little money, & less respect, than they would by digging the earth … [contrasted with the doctor] the lawyer has only to recollect, how many, by his dexterity, have been cheated of their right, and reduced to beggary. after all, I end where I began, with the observation that your son’s disposition, & your prudence, are the best arbiters of this question …
To David Campbell, January 28, 1810

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
A lawyer-leader’s take on the legal profession

In 1791, David Campbell wrote then Secretary of State Jefferson that he had named his first son Thomas Jefferson Campbell. Eighteen years later, the father sought the namesake’s opinion on whether his son should pursue law or medicine.

Jefferson acknowledged the naming honor and said the decision should be based on young Campbell’s natural inclination coupled with his father’s experience and wisdom. That being said, Jefferson (a practicing lawyer for seven years in the late 1760s and early 70s) weighed in with his opinion on the two professions.

Lawyers did not get high marks!
1. The practice of law was in disrepute.
2. It took an extraordinary man to achieve either honor or profit.
3. Ditch diggers earned more money and respect than most lawyers.
4. The lawyer’s legacy would be how many, by his skill, he had cheated and reduced to poverty.

Jefferson concluded by reiterating his original advice, that the decision should be made by father and son together.

“Our guests were impressed …
They found the content interesting, informative and provided great insight …”
Senior VP, Community Bankers Association of Illinois
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I do NOT want to go to court with you!

… litigation has ever been to me the most painful business I could be engaged in. to this has been owing some of the delays in the present case. the discussion however in this case has been attempered [blended with] by candor & friendship. and by the honest and mutual desire of seeking nothing but what is right. that this spirit animated your father, his letters on this subject, as well as his character prove. that it is equally yours, I feel as entire confidence as I have a knolege that my own wishes have no other object. in this spirit I tender you the assurances of my esteem & respect.
To John Harvie, December 28, 1809

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Consensus leaders choose loss rather than confrontation.
The Harvies were long-standing family friends. One John Harvie was guardian for Jefferson when he was a fatherless teenager. That Harvie’s son, also named John, was a contemporary of Jefferson’s. This John Harvie was the grandson, who had inherited a competing claim for land Jefferson believed was rightly his, acquired more than 30 years before. Each man asserted an undeniable claim to the land in question.

Jefferson hated confrontation, even with his political foes. He especially disliked it when it involved friends. Twice, Jefferson unsuccessfully sought arbitration to settle the matter. This John Harvie agreed to arbitration without conceding any claim to the land. Jefferson made these points:
1. Contending in court was the “most painful business” he knew.
2. He admitted delaying settlement in dread of that confrontation.
3. Both men had been straightforward and wanted “what is right,” even though they disagreed on what “right” was.
4. Harvie’s father was an honorable man, and surely the son would be, also.
5. That spirit would enable them to settle the matter equitably.

Two months later, they agreed to divide the land’s valuable equally. Each man, though firmly believing himself entitled to the whole thing, chose half a loaf instead out of respect for the other and the desire to avoid a fight.

“I want to compliment the MBA [Missouri Bankers Association] and Patrick Lee
for the excellent presentation he made as Thomas Jefferson …”
President and CEO, Citizens National Bank
Mr. Jefferson will make an excellent presentation for your audience!
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Leave a comment Posted in Monticello, Personal preferences, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , , , , |

Climate change, 19th century style

… the change which has taken place in our climate is one of those facts which all men of years are sensible of … I remember that when I was a small boy (say 60. years ago) snows were frequent and deep in every winter; to my knee very often, to my waist sometimes … and I remember, while yet young, to have heard from very old men that, in their youth, the winters had been still colder, with deeper & longer snows. in the year 1772. (37. years ago) we had a snow 2. feet deep in the Champain [level, open]parts of this state, & 3. feet in the counties next below the mountains. that year is still marked in conversation by the designation of ‘the year of the deep snow.
To Nathaniel Chapman, December 11, 1809

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Honest leaders admit when they can’t deliver.
The physician Chapman asked Jefferson’s help in documenting climate change. Jefferson had little to offer beyond personal recollection and a weather diary he kept in Washington City.

That recollection was of colder winters and heavier snowfall in his youth. When he was 29 (in 1772), snow ranged from 2 to 3 feet across Virginia. As President, he documented seven years’ annual snowfall in the nation’s capital from 4.5″ to 21″, the average being 14.5″.

Though lacking empirical data to help Chapman, his personal experience was of noticeably warmer winters over the course of a lifetime. He apologized for not being more able to help a fellow scientist.

… thanks for your excellent program…
I received nothing but compliments for your presentation as Thomas Jefferson.”
Past President, Cole County Historical Society
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How will we spend the surplus?

that redemption once effected [paying off the national debt], the revenue thereby liberated may, by a just repartition of it among the states, & a corresponding amendment of the constitution, be applied, in time of peace, to rivers, canals, roads, arts, manufactures, education, & other great objects within each state. in time of war, if injustice by ourselves or others must sometimes produce war, increased as the same revenue will be by increased population & consumption, & aided by other resources reserved for that crisis, it may meet within the year all the expences of the year, without encroaching on the rights of future generations by burthening them with the debts of the past. War will then be but a suspension of useful works; & a return to a state of peace a return to the progress of improvement.
Second Inaugural Address, March 4, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Wise leaders know being debt free opens lots of doors.
Jefferson anticipated a budget surplus and suggested this for the excess:
1. Some would be returned to the states on fair basis.
2. With a Constitutional Amendment, some would be spent on infrastructure, arts, education and commerce in peacetime.
3. In war time, increased consumption by an increasing population, along with other sources of income, would provide the revenue necessary for fighting.
4. War would be only “a suspension of useful works,” and peace would bring their return.
4. The present generation must not cripple the ones to come by passing present debt into the future.

“I would highly recommend your organization consider Mr. Lee
for an event that will be memorable for years to come.”
Conference Chair, ACSM-CLSA-NALS-WFPS [Surveyors]
Conference and Exposition, Las Vegas, NV
Mr. Jefferson will make a lasting impression on your audience!
I
nvite him to speak. Call 573-657-2739
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How do we regard other nations?

In the transaction of your foreign affairs, we have endeavored to cultivate the friendship of all nations … we have done them justice on all occasions … cherished mutual interests & intercourse on fair & equal terms. we are firmly convinced and we act on that conviction, that with nations, as with individuals, our interests, soundly calculated, will ever be found inseparable from our moral duties. and history bears witness to the fact, that a just nation is trusted on it’s word …
Second Inaugural Address, March 4, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Just leaders value honest relationships with other leaders.
Jefferson’s first inaugural address was forward-looking, the aspirations that would guide his administration. This report, four years later, would be an assessment of their progress toward those goals.

He began with foreign affairs, affirming the nation’s commitment to friendship with all and fairness in its dealings. He said there could be no difference between moral duties and actual performance. That rule applied both to individuals and nations. A nation which was just, like an individual who was just, could be counted on to do what they said they would do.

“Thank you for providing
the most unique keynote address we have ever had.”
Director of Operations, Indiana Telecommunication Association, Inc.
Thomas Jefferson will set a new standard for your keynote address!
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