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How would you attack a great evil?

In the very first session held under republican government, the assembly [Continental Congress, 1774] passed a law for the perpetual prohibition of the importation of slaves. This will in some measure stop the increase of this great political and moral evil, while the minds of our citizens may be ripening for complete emancipation of human nature.
Jefferson’s Notes on Virginia, Query VIII, 1782

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Wise leaders embrace great change in tiny increments.
Notes on Virginia was the only book Jefferson completed. It answered 23 questions posed by a Frenchman about the state. Most of the book is devoted to the natural history, or science, of Virginia. Question #8  is “The number if its inhabitants?”

Jefferson wrote about the growth in population from “the infancy of the colony,” which he estimated at 567,614 in 1781. He went into some detail whether it was wiser to grow their own population or increase it through immigration. (He preferred the former.) The answer ended with a paragraph on the “great political and moral evil” of slavery  and its support by the British government.

Jefferson pointed out that the first representative (republican, small r) national assembly, not meeting under the authority of the King, voted to forbid forever bringing more slaves to America. Jefferson hoped that slowing the increase in the slave population would eventually encourage Americans’ thinking toward the time when all slaves would be freed.

“… we were transported back to those times,
and we came away with a much better understanding … for those who lead today.”
Program Manager, Council of State Governments – WEST
We make 19th Century wisdom relevant for 21st Century audiences.
Call Patrick Lee, 573-657-2739

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