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Read my lips. NO new taxes!

[There was a hiccup in cyberspace, or in my brain, because this notice didn’t go out as it should have. Maybe this time?]

… the purchase of Louisiana will require the aid of all our resources to pay the interest of the additional debt without laying a new tax, and of course call for the adoption of every possible economy.
To Tobias Lear, July 14, 1803

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Bold initiatives don’t always require tax increases.
Lear (1762-1816) was best known as George Washington’s personal secretary for the last 15 years of Washington’s life. Lear’s reputation was a checkered one, but he also served President Jefferson as commercial agent in St. Domingo and then as Consul General to several North African city-states. Lear’s duties in Algiers and Tripoli included ongoing negotiations to protect American shipping in the Mediterranean Sea. That protection was secured, in part, by annual payments to those nations. The President was intent on holding the line on, if not decreasing, those payments.

Why? In part, because he wanted to pay the interest on new debt for the purchase of Louisiana without a new tax. To do so would obviously require “every possible economy.”

“Again, it was a delight working with you,
and I wish you much continued success!”
Executive Vice President, Carolina-Virginias Telephone Membership Association
Mr. Jefferson will delight your audience!
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Leave a comment Posted in Debt, Diplomacy, Foreign Policy Tagged , , , , , , , , , |

THIS is why government exists!

The dangers on the road to Natchez are really serious, & calling for attention. mere stationary posts, as proposed by Govr. Roan, appear to me inefficient. either a small body of cavalry, or mounted infantry, to be perpetually scouring the road and hovering about the caravans of passengers, as a marechaussée [local guard], seems worthy of consideration, as also the employing Indians in the same way, or offering rewards for apprehension & conviction of offenders.
To Gen. Henry Dearborne, July 12, 1803

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
The primary role of government is the protection of its citizens.
The Natchez Trace was originally an Indian trail some 450 miles long, from Natchez, MS, on the Mississippi River, to Nashville, TN. Now a road, or at least a widened trail, it was a primary route for travel through what was then the southwest. In recent months, bandits along the road had assaulted and robbed travelers, including a postal carrier, and had murdered one person.

The President commissioned his Secretary of War to take whatever steps were necessary to make the route safe. His suggestions included:
1. An armed, roving military force
2. Local guards to escort caravans
3. Rewards for apprehending criminals
4. Enlisting natives in its defense

Within six days, Dearborne acted on a number of these recommendations.

“The city officials were captivated and would have posed questions for another hour
if the time had been available.”
Executive Director, Missouri Municipal League
Mr. Jefferson delights to answer all questions from the audience.
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Leave a comment Posted in Government's proper role Tagged , , , , , , , , |

Haters gonna hate. *

I find our opposition is very willing to pluck feathers from Munroe [James Monroe], although not fond of sticking them into Livingston’s coat. the truth is, both have a just portion of merit, & were it necessary or proper it could be shewn that each has rendered peculiar services, & of important value. these grumblers too are very uneasy lest the administration should share some little credit for the acquisition, the whole of which they ascribe to the accident of war. they would be cruelly mortified could they see our files from May 1801, the first organisation of the administration, but more especially from April 1802.
To Horatio Gates, July 11, 1803

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Like the tortoise, smart leaders know the value of slow and steady.
Gates (1727-1806), a controversial Revolutionary War general, wrote an effusive letter praising the President’s acquisition of Louisiana. He also made a strong recommendation for William Smith, son-in-law of former President John Adams, to be named as head of a new government to be formed in New Orleans.

Jefferson acknowldeged Gates’ praise, and in turn, gave credit to both of his ambassadors, Robert Livingston and James Monroe, for their essential roles in securing Louisiana. He noted the Federalist opponents not only criticized both men but were also unwilling to give his administration any credit for the happy result. They claimed it had come about as an accident, a by-product of pending war between France and England. What the detractors didn’t know was that for the previous two years, Jefferson’s administration had actively pursued every possible diplomatic effort to secure New Orleans and avoid war with France over use of the Mississippi River.

Jefferson did not comment on Gates’ recommendation of Smith, nor did he appoint him to the position.

“… should you wish to use us as a reference, feel free to do so.”
President, Linn State Technical College
College Presidents recommend Thomas Jefferson!
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*Songwriters: Taylor Swift / Max Martin / Karl Johan Schuster
Shake It Off lyrics © Kobalt Music Publishing Ltd., Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC
Leave a comment Posted in Diplomacy, Politics Tagged , , , , , , , , |

Ooops! We cannot do this unless …

Amendment to the Constitution to be added to Art. IV. section III.
The Province of Louisiana is incorporated with the US. and made part thereof …
Revised Amendment to the Constitution, July 9, 1803

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Principled leaders respect the limits on their authority.
Six days prior to this draft, Jefferson received word that France would sell its North American holdings known as Louisiana to the United States. He was delighted! He also knew the Constitution did not provide full authority for this action.

Jefferson always maintained the national government had only those limited powers specifically granted by the Constitution. Adding Louisiana to the United States was not one of those powers. The solution was obvious, an amendment to that founding document that would grant that authority.

The President’s proposed amendment went on to provide all the necessary authorization to explore, police, develop and defend the new land, as well as to maintain “peace and good understanding with the Indians residing there.”

The amendment would go nowhere.

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Leave a comment Posted in Constitutional issues Tagged , , , , , , , , |

My debt keeps me from helping you now. Maybe later.

my great object at present is, within the course of my present term of office to get compleatly thro’ the old debts of mr Wayles’s estate & my own … if by the end of my second term of office (which will certainly be my last) I can see all of us out of debt, and my mill & farms in such a state as to supply the expences of living … if March 1809. can see me in that condition all my desires will be crowned with contentment to myself, and I hope to leave the public circumstances so much improved from what they were in March 1801. as to carry into retirement the contentment of the public.
To Thomas Mann Randolph, July 5, 1803

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Debt cripples everyone’s capacity to act, leaders included.
After reporting to his son-in-law about America’s fortuitous opportunity to buy all of Louisiana from France, the President turned to a personal matter, Randolph’s request for financial help. Jefferson was in no position to assist, because his own situation was strained.

More than 25 years before, Jefferson inherited heavily indebted lands from his father-in-law (“mr. Wayles estate”). He sold some of the land and with the proceeds, paid the English-held debt into escrow, awaiting the end of America’s war for independence. Though complicated to explain, the escrowed funds became worthless, and he had to pay the debt a second time. That debt, with its accrued interest, was still dogging him a quarter century later, as were the debts of his own making.

Jefferson thought his cash crops, tobacco and wheat, plus proceeds from his nail-making and grain-milling operations at Monticello, plus whatever he could spare from his own salary would see him debt free by the end of a second term in early 1809. He hoped to leave office, not only debt-free but with sufficient income for his retirement years, and to enjoy the public’s approval for the work he’d done.

He would be disappointed. His public standing in 1809, while generally  good, was considerably diminished from what it was in 1803. His personal debt was still far from being eliminated.

Personal money-management is not what Thomas Jefferson brings to your meeting,
but his many other skills merit your attention!
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Leave a comment Posted in Debt Tagged , , , , , , , , |

A birthday pig in a poke, with benefits!

On the evening of the 3d inst. [July] we recieved a letter from … Livingston & Monroe [America’s ambassadors to France on the subject of purchasing New Orleans and maintaining open Mississippi River navigation] … that on the 30th. of April they signed a treaty with France, ceding to us the island of N. Orleans and all Louisiana as it had been held by Spain. the price is not mentioned. we are in hourly expectation of the treaty by a special messenger … it is something larger than the whole US. probably containing 500 millions of acres, the US. containing 434. millions. this removes from us the greatest source of danger to our peace.
To Thomas Mann Randolph, July 5, 1803

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Happy birthday, Mr. President!
Jefferson concealed his own birth date, so people couldn’t celebrate him. He believed July 4 was the only date worthy of national celebration. Just hours before America’s 27th birthday, he’d received word that his spirited diplomatic efforts had yielded an unimaginable result: France would sell not only New Orleans but ALL of Louisiana! That would more than double the size of the nation and make the Mississippi River a totally American waterway.

Jefferson’s tactical goal had been met, securing duty-free shipping on all goods produced for export west of the Appalachian mountains. His strategic goal was met, too, eliminating what otherwise was inevitable, war with France over control of the Mississippi.

The President didn’t know the price! (A “pig in a poke” refers to a purchase where the buyer doesn’t really know the extent of the purchase or the price paid.) He expected to find out soon. He had authorized $10M for New Orleans and West Florida. He would soon be delighted to learn that the whole deal was signed for just $15M. Settlement of old shipping claims against France would significantly lower the purchase price to $11.25M.

This purchase would completely change the complexion of the Lewis & Clark Expedition, from a small company exploring foreign land to a large military company laying further claim to American land.

“… as Thomas Jefferson … His audiences have included … students, constitutional scholars,
lawyers and judges. He was very well received by these diverse groups.”

Director of Law-Related Education, The Missouri Bar
Mr. Jefferson will please your audience, whatever they are!
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Leave a comment Posted in Commerce, Diplomacy, Foreign Policy, Lewis & Clark, National Prosperity Tagged , , , , , , , , , |

Not so fast, lady!

Having occasion to have a communication made to Madame Teresa Ceracchi at Rome, & no correspondent there, I take the liberty of asking leave to do it through you. she is the widow of Ceracchi the Sculptor … I have recieved two letters painting her distresses & praying relief from Congress. she says in these that Ceracchi had been charged with the execution of a national monument to perpetuate the foundation of our republic, that he had made all his models in terra cotta, that this work was suspended, & he not paid for his labours, and she prays an indemnity from Congress. she is entirely mistaken in the facts, which were strictly as follows …
To Thomas Appleton, July 5, 1803

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Tender-hearted leaders must have a hard heart at times.
The “facts” as Jefferson related them were these: Cerracchi came to America on his own and pestered George Washington into sitting for a sculpting. Cerrachi used that clay bust as the centerpiece for a model and asked Congress to commission the work to honor the first President. Jefferson, no slouch when it came to art, called the model “a work of great genius,” but it had a price tag he knew would never be approved.

The sculptor, hoping to build support, sculpted 20 or so busts of Congressmen, even though he was repeatedly warned away from the project. He impoverished himself in the effort, angrily returned to France, where he was executed for his involvement in a plot against Napoleon. His financially distressed widow had since claimed payment from Congress for her husband’s work.

There was no basis for a claim against the government, but Jefferson didn’t want to turn her down cold. If any of the congressional busts still existed, he would buy them from her, out of his own pocket, at the going rate of $7.50-10.00 each. He would pay seven times that amount for the bust of Washington. Jefferson did not want his involvement known and asked Appleton to convey both the denial and the offer in his own words.

Appleton was a merchant and buyer in Italy. Not wanting to waste the opportunity, the President asked him “to send me one or two gross of the best Florence wine.”

“Patrick Lee is a professional … both easy to work with from my end
and very effective portraying Thomas Jefferson …”
Director, Living History Associates, Ltd., Richmond, VA
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Leave a comment Posted in Culture, Miscellaneous Tagged , , , , , , , , |

Let us banish the murderous slave, for the good of all.

should Brown recover so that the law shall inflict no punishment on Cary, it will be necessary for me to make an example of him in terrorem [to induce fear] to others… if he could be sold in any other quarter so distant as never more to be heard of among us, it would to the others be as if he were put out of the way by death. I should regard price but little in comparison with so distant an exile of him as to cut him off compleatly from ever again being heard of … in the mean time let him remain in jail at my expence, & under orders not to permit him to see or speak to any person whatever.”
To Thomas Mann Randolph, June 8, 1803

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Realistic leaders know harsh actions merit harsh consequences.
Cary and Brown were slaves in Jefferson’s nail-making shop. Cary had attacked Brown, and Brown’s survival was in question. If Brown died, the law Jefferson referred to required criminal prosection of Cary. If Brown survived, punishment was left to the discretion of the slave owner.

Jefferson’s choice was to direct his son-in-law to sell Cary to some far-distant owner, both to be done with his influence and to send a strong message to other slaves. The price Cary might bring was not a factor. Restoring order at Monticello was. Until that was accomplished, Jefferson would bear the expense to keep Cary incarcerated and away from everyone.

“… You were just outstanding as Thomas Jefferson.
I have no idea how you pulled if off so well,
but you certainly did.”
Substantive Program Chair,
U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit
Judicial Conference, Point Clear, AL
Mr. Jefferson knows how to pull it off so well and will do so for your audience.
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Leave a comment Posted in Family matters, Human nature, Slavery Tagged , , , , , , , |

Say WHAT?

621. 1410. 327. 251. 569. 1402. 640. 146. 1486. 1445. 956. 530. 43. 954. 1399. 1006. 1436. 1379 1576. 1372. 1501. 1436. 981. 167. 996. 548. 604. 805. 809. 1046. 377. 1401. 1513. 1274. 1067. 1440. 569. 663. 981. 818. 1443. 270. 1315. 1440. 627. 1310. 219. 179. 1337. 520. 1440. 1225. 271. 569. 1549. 925. 1153. 569. 341. 801. 1501. 126. 1550. 94. 352. 879. 569. 177. 1507. 1042. 1102. 439. 271. 1440. 1513. 1410. 451.
To James Monroe, June 5, 1803

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Leaders loathe leaks!
Jefferson hated having his correspondence made public. That may have been why he loved ciphers, devices or schemes that would allow him to send coded messages. This is his entire letter to his new ambassador to France. This code was one Secretary of State James Madison had given Monroe for diplomatic communication while the latter was still in the United States. I cannot tell if the code is the same one Jefferson developed and gave to Meriwether Lewis.

Why the President felt the need to encode this letter is unclear, unless he was just practicing. The letter explained a canister of tea he was sending to a friend, Madame de Corny, in France. The link for that letter includes the full text, but their deciphering the first part of it yielded this:
“tho mas je fer son to ja mes mon ro june 5 eighteen hundred three this can is ter of te a is for my fri end mad dam de cor ny I ad dre s it to you for del iv ery …”

This seven year old post will tell you more about Jefferson and his ciphers. (The Wall Street Journal link works only if you have a subscription.)

“It was heartening to see our members and guests so engaged during your portrayal
as well as in the many individual conversations they had with you during the day.”
Executive Director, Nevada Association of Counties
Mr. Jefferson delights to engage your audience!
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Thomas Jefferson on using a secret code

Leave a comment Posted in Diplomacy Tagged , , , , , , , , |

I make a lot of money, but …

… as the salary annexed to my office looks large in every man’s eye, it draws the attention of the needy in every part of the Union and increases the demands of aid, far beyond the proportion of means it furnishes to satisfy them. I am obliged therefore to proceed by rule, & not to give to one the share of another.
To Isaac Briggs, May 20, 1803

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Leaders always have people asking them for favors.
Jefferson’s friend, Isaac Briggs (1763-1825), was an engineer, surveyor and inventor of considerable renown. This short letter covered a half dozen subjects, including the many requests he received for money. Those requests were prompted by the size of the President’s salary.

That salary was $25,000 per year. It was established for President Washington and continued unchanged through the first 18 executives, ending with Ulysses S. Grant. It was a sizeable sum, and it attracted the attention of many who sought the President’s support for their particular cause. In Jefferson’s time, at least, that salary had to cover all the costs of staffing and running the President’s House, later called the White House. Those expenses, increased by Jefferson’s sometimes lavish personal tastes, made his actual compensation far less.

The requests for help were numerous and beyond any ability to satisfy. Jefferson’s rule was that he supported a few personal causes only and would not deprive them to help the masses.

“…what a pleasure it was to have you entertain our guests [on the Mississippi]
The top notch performance you gave was evident …”
CEO, President, Riverbarge Excursion Lines
Mr. Jefferson doesn’t just inspire & teach. He entertains, too!
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Leave a comment Posted in Miscellaneous, Presidency Tagged , |