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Slippery & double-faced or The Golden Rule?

The Count de Vergennes had the reputation with the diplomatic corps of being wary & slippery in his diplomatic intercourse; and so he might be with those whom he knew to be slippery and double-faced themselves. As he saw that I had no indirect views, practised no subtleties, meddled in no intrigues, pursued no concealed object, I found him as frank, as honorable, as easy of access to reason as any man with whom I had ever done business …
Autobiography, 1821

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Servant leaders treat others the way they would like to be treated.
Charles Graves, Count de Vergennes, 1717-1787, was Frances’s Foreign Minister and an early advocate of French support for the American Revolution. He had been a French diplomat throughout Europe for over 40 years. As America’s Ambassador to France, Jefferson and the Count had regular contact.

Other nations’ diplomats found the Count “wary & slippery.” No doubt Jefferson knew about the French Minister’s reputation before they met. Jefferson could have approached him on that basis but chose to have an open mind, instead. In time, he suggested those nations’ diplomats were “slippery and double-faced” themselves and thus received like treatment in return.

Jefferson had no such difficulties with the Count. Why? Jefferson was straightforward with the French minister, had no hidden agendas and stayed out of matters that didn’t concern him. He was both honest and forthright with the Count, and received the same respectful treatment in response.

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