Tag Archives: Alcoholism

What to do with an excellent workman, now a drunk?

William Stewart, a smith who has lived with me at Monticello some years … is one of the first workmen in America, but within these 6. months has taken to drink … abandoned his family … he writes me word he will return, & desires me to send him 20. D. to bear his expences back … [this] would only enable him to continue his dissipations. I … [enclose] that sum to you … [as] charity for his family of asking the favor of you to encourage him to return to them, to pay his passage … & give him in money his reasonable expences on the road … if he has more it will only enable him to drink & stop by the way. when he arrives here I shall take other measures to forward him. he is become so unfit for any purposes of mine, that my only anxiety now is on account of his family …
To Jones & Howell, November 22, 1803

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Humane leaders demonstrate concern for employees’ families.
Stewart, a gifted craftsman in Jefferson’s long-term employ, began drinking, abandoned his family and vowed never to return. He had a change of heart and wrote his patron from Philadelphia, asking for $20 to get back to Monticello.

Cash-in-hand would only enable Stewart to drink. Instead, and only out of concern for Stewart’s family, he sent the amount requested to trusted businessmen in Philadelphia, asking them to encourage Stewart’s return. They were to purchase his passage home and give him only what he’d need for food and lodging on the three day journey, no “more than 2. or 3. dollars a day.”

Jefferson had no use for the Stewart upon his return but was greatly concerned for his family, “consisting of a very excellent wife & several children.”

“I do hope the opportunity presents itself to work with you again …”
Conference Coordinator, Iowa League of Cities
Thomas Jefferson makes a most favorable impression!
Invite him to speak. Call 573-657-2739
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In the face of great unpleasantness …

when we see ourselves in a situation which must be endured & gone through, it is best to make up our minds to it, meet it with firmness, & accomodate every thing to it in the best way practicable. this lessens the evil. while fretting & fuming only serves to increase our own torment. the errors and misfortunes of others should be a school for our own instruction.
To Mary Jefferson Eppes, January 7, 1798

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Effective leaders benefit from having this ability.
Mary Eppes was Jefferson’s younger daughter, married just three months earlier. In a letter full of advice on how to maintain marital harmony, he began with the distressing news of his sister, Mary, whose husband of nearly 40 years was in a state of “habitual intoxication.” She was very impatient with him. Not only might that impatience compel her husband to continue drinking, it made her even more miserable.

With that backdrop, Jefferson counseled his daughter to meet unpleasantness with firmness and a determination to make the best of the situation. “This lessens the evil” while worry and anger only “increase our own torment.” He advised her to learn from “the errors and misfortunes of others,” rather than be sucked into their consequences.

“I am still receiving phone calls and notes from title people
all over the state telling me what a wonderful job you did …”

Missouri Land Title Association
Mr. Jefferson will make you look good to your audience!
Invite him to speak. 573-657-2739
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