Tag Archives: Leadership

Let us do this to avoid war.

I think therefore, that while we do nothing which the first nation on earth [France] would deem crouching, we had better give to all our communications with them a very mild, complaisant, and even friendly complection, but always independant. ask no favors, leave small & irritating things to be conducted by the individuals interested in them, interfere ourselves but in the greatest cases, & then not push them to irritation. no matter at present existing between them & us is important enough to risk a breach of peace; peace being indeed the most important of all things to us, except the preserving an erect & independant attitude.
To Robert Livingston, October 10, 1802

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Smart leaders take pains to avoid giving offense to one’s adversaries.
While France had not yet taken possession of Louisiana, it was only a matter of time before she would influence shipping on the Mississippi River and control all goods flowing through the port of New Orleans. Jefferson foresaw the potential for great conflict with France and very likely, war.

While diplomatic efforts proceeded to eliminate that conflict, the President gave these pointers to his ambassador in France to minimize unnecessary aggravation:
1. While not acting in any way subservient, the U.S. should be calm, agreeable and friendly, but always independent.
2. Don’t put us in their debt by asking any favors.
3. Leave minor disputes to be worked out by those affected by them.
4. Concern yourself only with the largest disputes or issues.
5. Be diplomatic even in those great issues, giving no cause for irritation.
6. Nothing should jeopardize our greatest goal of peace, except this one thing, maintaining America’s unflinching independence.

Jefferson’s skilled diplomatic dance resulted the following year in acquiring Louisiana from France and eliminating the conflict that could have resulted in war.

“… many participants remarked on the value of Lee’s presentation.
A number had seen his
[earlier]
performance …
and expressed that it was equally compelling.”

Executive Director, Greater St. Louis Federal Executive Board
Mr. Jefferson’s wisdom and compelling presentation will bring value to your meeting!
Invite him to speak. Call 573-657-2739
Leave a comment Posted in Diplomacy, Foreign Policy Tagged , , , , , , , , , |

This father suggests letting the child win this one.

I have recieved a letter from Governor Strong on the subject of their cannon &c. which concerning the War department principally, I inclose to Genl. Dearborne, and must ask the favor of you to be referred to him for a sight of it. I think, where a state is pressing, we should yield in cases not very unreasonable, and treat them with the indulgence and liberality of a parent.
To Robert Smith, September 3, 1802

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Smart leaders know when to yield, even when right is on their side.
In 1798, Massachusetts transferred ownership of a fort in the Boston harbor to the federal government. A provision in that transfer called for the state to be reimbursed for the value of armaments within the fort. Massachusetts submitted its claim, and the national government had disputed the extent and amount of that reimbursement. The state’s governor, a moderate Federalist, was pressing the Republican administration to pay the bill in full.

The President involved the Secretaries of the Navy (Smith, the recipient of this letter) and War, Henry Dearborne, in this discussion. It appears that the Federal position might have been stronger, but Jefferson asked a favor of his subordinate. Massachusetts was pressing their case strongly but not unreasonably. It would be better, the President wrote, to treat the state as a parent would their child, with “indulgence and liberality,” rather than enforcing parental authority, regardless.

“Mr. Patrick Lee did a wonderful job of portraying Thomas Jefferson …
He also tailored his presentation to fit in with our theme of “Exploring New Frontiers.” “
Executive Director, Missouri Independent Bankers Association
No cookie-cutter talks here! Mr. Jefferson tailors his remarks to your interests.
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Leave a comment Posted in Miscellaneous, Politics Tagged , , , , , , , , , |

I need another set of eyes on this!

Reynolds, collector of York, is dead, and Wm. Carey of that place is recommended very strongly by mr Shields. tho’ I have great confidence in mr Shields’s recommendation, yet as the best men some times see characters thro’ the false medium of friendship I pray you to make what enquiry you can in Richmond & communicate it to me.
To Governor James Monroe, September 3, 1802

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Careful leaders seek more than just a single recommendation.
William Reynolds, recently deceased, had held the position of Collector of Revenue at Yorktown since 1794. Samuel Sheilds wrote a glowing recommendation on behalf of William Carey to succeed Reynolds.

While affirming his confidence in Mr. Sheilds, Jefferson wanted other perspectives on this potential appointee. He needed assurance that Sheilds’ recommendation wasn’t affected by the “false medium of friendship.” Thus, the President sought input from another trusted source, Virginia’s governor.

Carey was appointed, but for some reason, resigned the position within a month.

“All were delighted with your well-chosen words of wisdom …
We heard nothing but praise from the audience members.”
Policy Director/Conference Coordinator, Washington State Association of Counties
Mr. Jefferson is most interested in sharing his wisdom with your audience!
Invite him to speak. Call 573-657-2739
Leave a comment Posted in Human nature, Politics Tagged , , , , , , , |

We have TOO many federal judges!

I wish you to consider whether it would not be useful, by a circular to the clerks of the federal courts, to call for a docket of the cases decided in the last twelvemonth, say from July 1. 1801. to July 1. 1802. to be laid before Congress. it will be satisfactory to them, & to all men to see how little is to be done by the federal judiciary, and will effectually crush the clamour still raised on the suppression of the new judges. I think it a proper document to be furnished annually, as it may enable us to make further simplifications of that corps.
To James Madison, August 30, 1802

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Smart leaders seek documentation for their choices.
Before President Adams left office in 1801, the Federalist Congress greatly increased the number of judges in federal courts. This had the desired effect of saddling the incoming Jefferson administration with a politically hostile judiciary. The new President took whatever steps he could to reverse or curtail those appointments. His actions infuriated the Federalists.

In this letter to his Secretary of State, Jefferson asked his opinion about requiring court clerks to document how many cases each judge had decided in the previous year. He would present that report to the Congress, proving how little work the judges actually did. That should “crush the clamor” that still surrounded his efforts to reduce their number. In addition, if that information was tracked each year, it would provide the basis for reducing the federal judiciary even more.

Madison responded four days later, suggesting this documentation might better be required by the Congress. The Executive Branch had no funding to accomplish it. It also had no authority to require the court clerks to do it, and some might simply refuse. Nevertheless, he would proceed however the President wished.

”I would highly recommend your organization consider Mr. Lee
for an event that will be memorable for years to come.”
Conference Chairman, Nevada Association of Land Surveyors
Invite Thomas Jefferson to speak.
Call 573-657-2739
Leave a comment Posted in Judiciary, Lawyers Tagged , , , , , , |

My friend, I am so sorry I had to fire your brother.

the act of duty which removed your brother from office, was one of the most painful and unwilling which I have had to perform. very soon after our administration was formed, the situation of his accounts … the failure to render accounts periodically, the disagreement among those he did render, gave reason to believe he was imprudently indulging himself in the use of the public money. what were the circumstances which led him to this, was not an enquiry permitted to us.
To Elbridge Gerry, August 28, 1802

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Effective leading sometimes requires personally painful decisions.
Gerry (1744-1814) was a well-regarded Massachusetts politician, friend and ally of Jefferson. His brother, Samuel, had been appointed years before by President Washington to be a customs (tax) collector in Massachusetts. Samuel mismanaged the office and had not remitted all the taxes due of him. He’d been given opportunity to account for his affairs and pay what was owed and had not done so.

Elbridge Gerry wrote an incredibly long and impassioned letter to Jefferson on behalf of his brother. (3,500 words! By contrast, the Declaration of Independence is just over 1,300 words.) Nonetheless, Jefferson, who hated confrontation, removed Samuel Elbridge from his position. He responded to his friend’s plea, explaining how painful it was to fire his brother. Samuel could have made the situation right and did not. There was no alternative.

Elbridge Gerry was Governor of Massachusetts in 1812 when he reluctantly approved a new redistricting plan for the state legislature. Some new districts had very unusual shapes, created to favor republicans. One senatorial district was so convoluted as to resemble a salamander in shape. Combining the governor’s name with that amphibian gave rise to the term gerrymander, still used today to describe ill-shaped legislative districts created to benefit one party over another.

“Mr. Jefferson’s presentation on leadership was a wonderful and unique way
to kick off an extremely successful conference.”
Meeting Planner, County Commissioners Association of Pennsylvania
Let Mr. Jefferson add a unique and memorable dimension to your meeting.
Invite him to speak. Call 573-657-2739
Leave a comment Posted in Federal finances, Politics Tagged , , , , , , , , |

Such a level-headed clergyman is rare! And appreciated!

the restoration of the rights of conscience to two thirds of the citizens of Virginia in the beginning of the revolution [the disestablishment of state church in 1786], has merited to those who had agency in it, the everlasting hostility of such of the clergy as have a hankering after the union of church & state. the right of political opinion is as sacred as that of religious, and altho’ a man’s political opinions ought to have influence in confiding political trusts, they should no more affect the state of society than his religious opinions.
To Daniel D’Oyley, August 15, 1802

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Wise leaders oppose religious control but not religious influence.
South Carolinian D’Oyley forwarded to the President a July 4th address by a Baptist pastor in Charleston. That clergyman supported the revolution a quarter century before and the current administration’s efforts to safeguard the nation’s republican principles, especially the separation of church and state. Such reasoned support from the clergy was rare.

Jefferson harkened back to his successful effort in the 1780s to break the official tie between the Anglican church and Virginia’s government. Those who supported that effort bore the wrath of the clergy whose favored position was eliminated.

Both political and religious rights were sacred and should be acted upon, but one was not superior to the other.

“Your portrayal of Thomas Jefferson was both entertaining and informative …
adding a unique element to the conference program.”
Co-Conference Coordinator, Natural Areas Association
Mr. Jefferson will, indeed, add a unique element to your meeting!
Invite him to speak. Call 573-657-2739

 

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If at all possible, keep government out of it!

With respect to the 5th. section, taking from coasting vessels employed in this trade the privilege of carrying any foreign articles, if yourself & mr Steele concurred in this, I should be content with it. but if you were of a different opinion, I should join you on the general principle of never imposing a restriction which can be done without.
To Albert Gallatin, August 14, 1802

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Wise leaders keep their hands off when they can.
Gallatin, Jefferson’s Secretary of Treasury, had critiqued regulations regarding shipping in the coastal regions surrounding Spanish-controlled New Orleans. One of those regulations required American vessels to carry only American goods. The President deferred to Gallatin’s judgment in the matter.

If Gallatin favored the restriction, Jefferson would support his decision. If, however, Gallatin favored a hands-off policy, allowing ships to carry foreign goods, too, that was more to Jefferson’s liking. He preferred staying out of a matter that didn’t require government’s intervention.

“The question and answer aspect of your program …
kept our members in their seats until the very end.”
Executive Director, Association of Indiana Counties
Mr. Jefferson delights to answer your members’ questions after his remarks. No holds barred!
Invite him to speak. Call 573-657-2739
Leave a comment Posted in Government's proper role Tagged , , , , , , |

I opened it by mistake. I apologize.

Th: Jefferson presents his respectful salutations to Judge Washington and incloses him a package which came to Th:J. in a very voluminous mail. opening the letters hastily & without always reading the superscription [sender’s name], he had opened this and read some lines in M. de la Fayette’s letter before he discovered it not to be meant for him. looking at the corner & finding his mistake he instantly re-incloses it with an assurance on his honor that he did not see a word beyond the 4th. or 5th lines in la Fayette’s letter and not one in the others. he hopes Judge Washington will accept his apology & his regret for this accident
To Bushrod Washington, August 13, 1802

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Principled leaders do not take advantage of another’s mistake.
Bushrod Washington (1762-1829) was George Washington’s nephew, heir, executor of his estate and Supreme Court justice for more than 30 years, appointed to the Court in 1798 by President Adams. The rift between Jefferson and the first President had grown pronounced before the latter’s death in 1799. Bushrod would be considered both a personal and political opponent of Thomas Jefferson.

Bushrod was compiling a history of the Revolutionary War and using correspondence between his late uncle and Marquis de Lafayette. A packet of that correspondence mailed to Bushrod had come to President by mistake, who opened it, not noting the addressee on the package. He read just a few lines, realized the package was not for him, and only then noticed Bushrod’s name on the outside. He immediately resealed the package and included this letter of apology.

“Some of the comments…included…
Very entertaining; A good way to close out; Fun and fitting; and Wow! What a finish”
President, Professional Event Services, for the Rural Cellular Association, Boston, MA
Mr. Jefferson will add a Wow! factor to your meeting.
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Leave a comment Posted in History Tagged , , , , , , , |

Is this shrewd or underhanded?

the cheapest & most effectual instrument we can use for preserving the friendship of the Indians: is the establishment of trading houses among them. if we could furnish goods enough to supply all their wants, and sell them goods so cheap that no private trader could enter into competition with us, we should thus get rid of those traders who are the principal fomenters of the uneasiness of the Indians: and by being so essentially useful to the Indians we should of course become objects of affection to them. there is perhaps no method more irresistable of obtaining lands from them than by letting them get in debt, which when too heavy to be paid, they are always willing to lop off by a cession of lands.
To Henry Dearborn, August 13, 1802

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
What’s a leader to do?
Dearborn (1751-1829) was Jefferson’s Secretary of War. This letter dealt with issues surrounding whites and Indians living on either side of the lower Ohio River. Whites were continually moving further west into Indian lands, and the President had to deal with the conflict that inevitably arose. He tried to do that in two ways, first to pacify the Indians and second, to encourage (or force) them to transfer ownership of some (or all) of their lands.

Here, Jefferson proposed an approach he favored for many years:
1. Establish trading stores for the Indians.
4. Drive out competition from private traders who stirred up trouble among the Indians.
2. Sell necessities at low prices, encouraging Indians to become farmers like the white men.
3. Be so helpful to the Indians they would come to like the white men.

The final sentence is uncharacteristic for this humane man. He proposed creating indebtedness in the Indians and then forgiving that debt in return for their relinquishing some of their land.

“The presentation was very educational,informative
and the details seemed to come to life …”
Director of Member Services, Association of Louisiana Electric Cooperatives
Watch Thomas Jefferson come to life for your audience!
Invite him to speak. Call 573-657-2739
Leave a comment Posted in Debt, Native Americans Tagged , , , , , , , , |

Appearances matter, even small ones.

…altho saving of one salary to the publick is but a small consideration yet the Salutory [salutary, i.e. beneficial] scheme of oeconomy so valuable to our repubican Goverment can not be carried into full effect unless things of this kind be noticed…
Thomas Underwood, Jr. to Thomas Jefferson, July 25, 1802

I recieve information that [John] Hopkins Commr. [Commissioner]  of loans in Richmd. being allowed by law 2. clerks and having scarceley occasion for one, in fact employs but one, & gives him the salary of two. will you have this enquired into, and exact restitution of the double salary illegally given.
To Albert Gallatin, August 3, 1802

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Careful leaders promptly investigate abuses under their command.
Underwood was the whistleblower, informing Jefferson that John Hopkins, a Federalist officer-holder and businessman in Richmond had authorization to employ two clerks when he needed only one and was paying that one a double salary. Underwood acknowledged that saving one salary was negligible, but the nation’s republican principles must be upheld, and the people would appreciate the gesture.

Jefferson had to contend with many government employees who were appointed by Presidents Washington and Adams. He accepted Federalist officers who performed their duties impartially but had no patience with ones who abused the trust placed in them.

He acted immediately in this case, directing his Treasury Secretary Gallatin to investigate and recover any funds spent illegally. Two weeks later, Gallatin furnished the President with a certificate verifying that Hopkins had submitted the names of the two clerks he claimed to employ. Gallatin went no further, saying Jefferson’s source must verify whether Hopkins actually employed only one.

The results of this matter are not disclosed, but Hopkins remained in his position for another two years.

“I want to thank you … for a wonderful evening with Daniel Boone.”
Vice President, Site Development Engineering, Inc., St. Louis, MO
Mr. Jefferson’s contemporary, frontiersman Daniel Boone,
stands ready to inspire, teach and entertain your audience.
Invite him to speak. Call 573-657-2739
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