Tag Archives: Inaugural Address

God help me. God help us. Part 13

I shall need too the favour of that being in whose hands we are: who led our fathers, as Israel of old, from their native land; and planted them in a country flowing with all the necessaries & comforts of life; who has covered our infancy with his providence, & our riper years with his wisdom & power: & to whose goodness I ask you to join in supplications with me, that he will so enlighten the minds of your servants, guide their councils, & prosper their measures, that whatsoever they do shall result in your good, & shall secure to you the peace, friendship, & approbation of all nations.
Second Inaugural Address, March 4, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Wise leaders freely acknowledge the need of a higher power.
In the previous post, Thomas Jefferson asked his constituent’s help in his second term. Now, he asked God’s. He affirmed God’s hand in establishing, protecting, provisioning and empowering America.

He asked their prayers be added to his, for enlightened leaders, guidance in their debates, and success in their efforts.  The citizens’ good and peace with other nations were the goals.

While the President was not a Christian, neither was he a deist, as often described. Deists held the “clockmaker” doctrine, that God made the universe (the clock), wound it up, and left it to run itself. Jefferson believed in a more benevolent God, one involved in human affairs and who rewarded in an afterlife based on good deeds in this one.

This is the last in a series of 13 posts drawn from Jefferson’s Second Inaugural Address. Jefferson lacked a strong public speaking voice and conveyed it to the public and the Congress in writing.
“I wish to express my sincere appreciation for your professional presentation …
before our rather large audience.”
Executive Director, Western Coal Transportation Association
Invite Thomas Jefferson to speak.
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NOTE: The link to Thomas Jefferson’s letter is subject to change by Founders’ Archive. It was accurate when this post was written. If the link is now wrong, go to FoundersArchives.gov. Cut a few words from the letter in the post, paste them into the search box at the top, with beginning and ending quotation marks, and click the GO button. The correct letter … should … come up.
Or call me. I’ll help you find it.
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I will fail. Please forgive me. Part 12

I shall now enter [my second term as President] … , & shall proceed in the spirit of those principles which they have approved. I fear not that any motives of [self] interest may lead me astray. I am sensible of no passion which could seduce me knowingly from the path of justice. but the weaknesses of human nature, & the limits of my own understanding will produce errors of judgment sometimes injurious to your interests. I shall need therefore all the indulgence which I have heretofore experienced from my constituents. the want of it will certainly not lessen with increasing years.
Second Inaugural Address, March 4, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Humble leaders know they can be prone to failure.
As Thomas Jefferson neared the end of his address, he pledged continued allegiance to the principles the voters approved. He knew of nothing that could dissuade him from those principles. He also understood “the weaknesses of human nature” and “the limits of my own understanding.” Those would cause him to make mistakes.

He asked that the grace shown him in the past would continue. Even worse, the aging process (he was almost 62, average life expectancy for a male at the time) would put him in need of even more grace for his errors.

“For an inspirational message with meaningful content, and one that is also entertaining,
we highly recommend Patrick Lee!”
Assistant Executive Director, Pennsylvania Society of Land Surveyors
We come highly recommended!
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NOTE: The link to Thomas Jefferson’s letter is subject to change by Founders’ Archive. It was accurate when this post was written. If the link is now wrong, go to FoundersArchives.gov. Cut a few words from the letter in the post, paste them into the search box at the top, with beginning and ending quotation marks, and click the GO button. The correct letter … should … come up.
Or call me. I’ll help you find it.
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We cut government w-a-y back. Taxes, too. Part 1

At home, fellow-citizens …  the suppression of unnecessary offices, of useless establishments and expences, enabled us to discontinue our internal taxes. these covering our land with officers, & opening our doors to their intrusions, had already begun that process of domiciliary vexation, which, once entered, is scarcely to be restrained from reaching successively every article of property & produce.
Thomas Jefferson’s Second Inaugural Address, March 4, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Smart leaders sometimes do LESS, not MORE.
The President reported to the Congress on progress made during his first term. After a paragraph devoted to pursuing open and friendly relations with all like-minded nations, he turned his attention to domestic affairs.

Previous administrations had expanded the role of government and the taxes necessary to support it. Jefferson took the opposite position during his first four years, cutting unnecessary offices, expenses, and taxes . No longer were there “internal taxes,” ones levied by the government on its own citizens. Gone as well were the tax collectors interfering with citizens’ personal lives, or “domiciliary vexation.”  If those practices were not curtailed, the government’s appetite would eventually tax “every article of property & produce,” i.e. everything you own and everything you make.

“The educational experience he offers is of great value to audiences of all ages.”
Executive Director, National Coal Transportation Association
Do you want great value for your conference and your members?
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How do we regard other nations?

In the transaction of your foreign affairs, we have endeavored to cultivate the friendship of all nations … we have done them justice on all occasions … cherished mutual interests & intercourse on fair & equal terms. we are firmly convinced and we act on that conviction, that with nations, as with individuals, our interests, soundly calculated, will ever be found inseparable from our moral duties. and history bears witness to the fact, that a just nation is trusted on it’s word …
Second Inaugural Address, March 4, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Just leaders value honest relationships with other leaders.
Jefferson’s first inaugural address was forward-looking, the aspirations that would guide his administration. This report, four years later, would be an assessment of their progress toward those goals.

He began with foreign affairs, affirming the nation’s commitment to friendship with all and fairness in its dealings. He said there could be no difference between moral duties and actual performance. That rule applied both to individuals and nations. A nation which was just, like an individual who was just, could be counted on to do what they said they would do.

“Thank you for providing
the most unique keynote address we have ever had.”
Director of Operations, Indiana Telecommunication Association, Inc.
Thomas Jefferson will set a new standard for your keynote address!
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What do laborers need on Labor Day?

…  with all these blessings, what more is necessary to make us a happy and a prosperous people? Still one thing more, fellow-citizens — a wise and frugal Government, which shall restrain men from injuring one another, shall leave them otherwise free to regulate their own pursuits of industry and improvement, and shall not take from the mouth of labor the bread it has earned. This is the sum of good government, and this is necessary to close the circle of our felicities [happiness].
Thomas Jefferson’s First Inaugural Address, March 4, 1801

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Laborers need a hands-off government.
Jefferson saw the election of 1800 as the second American revolution. The voters rejected an activist national government and the taxes necessary to support it. They also rejected a fondness toward England and any possibility of a constitutional monarchy.

Jefferson’s inaugural address outlined the major principles which would guide his administration. He tried to bridge the gap between the political parties with this, “We have called by different names brethren of the same principle. We are all Republicans, we are all Federalists,”

Jefferson proposed a government which was wise, frugal, and intervened only to keep people from harming one another. Beyond that, government should let its citizens self-regulate for their own “industry and improvement.” Free to prosper in this way, government should not tax away what Americans labored to produce.

There were a number of taxes in 1801. Four years later, in his Second Inaugural Address, Jefferson would boast about the elimination of that burden when he asked “…what farmer, what mechanic, what laborer, ever sees a tax-gatherer of the United States?”

“The Missouri School Boards Association recommended Patrick Lee
in the persona of Thomas Jefferson [for our Leadership Conference].
There could not have been a better choice.”

Illinois School Boards Association
Jefferson will honor the labor of your audience.
Invite him to speak.Call 573-657-2739
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