Tag Archives: Jefferson Leadership Blog

What about America’s Aborigines? Part 7b

But the endeavors to enlighten them on the fate which awaits their present course of life, to induce them to exercise their reason, follow it’s dictates, & change their pursuits with the change of circumstances, have powerful obstacles to encounter …  the habits of their bodies, prejudices of their minds, ignorance, pride, & the influence of interested & crafty individuals among them, who [fear loss of influence] … these persons inculcate a sanctimonious reverence for the customs of their ancestors; that whatsoever they did must be done through all time … that their duty is to remain as their creator made them, ignorance being safety, and knolege full of danger …  they too have their Anti-Philosophists [anti-science, reason and progress] …
Second Inaugural Address, March 4, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Wise leaders understand there are powerful influences against change.
The previous post outlined Thomas Jefferson’s strong support for helping native Americans transition from hunting to agriculture. This post details their difficulty in doing so.

While business-as-usual was not possible for the Indians, they faced formidable challenges to a new way of life. In addition to their own “habits … prejudices … ignorance [&] pride,” some in their midst insisted they must remain as they always had been, with safety in ignorance, fearing danger in knowledge.

In this regard, Jefferson drew a parallel to his own political opposition, “Anti-Philosophists.” Both cultures had to contend with those who only looked backwards and resisted all change.

“It was a great pleasure to have you return the the Old Court for our annual
“Historic Fourth of July Celebration”.”
Superintendent, Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, National Park Service
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What about America’s Aborigines? Part 7a

The Aboriginal inhabitants [native Americans] … with the faculties & the rights of men, breathing an ardent love of liberty and independance, & … [having] no desire but to be undisturbed … have been overwhelmed by the current [of immigrant Americans] … humanity enjoins us to teach them agriculture & the domestic arts; to encourage them to that industry … & to prepare them in time for that state of society, which to bodily comforts adds the improvement of the mind & morals. we have therefore liberally furnished them with the implements of husbandry & houshold use; we have placed among them instructors in the arts of first necessity; and they are covered with the Aegis [protection] of the law against aggressors from among ourselves.
Second Inaugural Address, March 4, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Enlightened leaders seek improvement of marginalized members.
Thomas Jefferson had a lifelong interest in America’s native citizens and their improvement. He recognized they had the same rights and aspirations as all people. Although they wished to be left alone, they were being “overwhelmed” by white people pushing further and further west.

Inevitably, their prosperous future was in “agriculture & the domestic arts.” It was the white man’s responsibility to teach those arts for the natives’ improvement in body, soul and spirit. To that end, his administration had furnished both agricultural and household materials and instructors in their use. On top of this, they were protected by law from aggression by white settlers.

Jefferson believed that given enough time, the Indians could become farmers like the white men. Then they would no longer need vast expanses for hunting, and those lands could be opened for settlement. While some natives were assimilated, he greatly underestimated their attachment to their own culture and resistance to change.

“This is a letter of recommendation for Patrick Lee
and his presentation of Thomas Jefferson …
Mr. Lee’s presentation was fantastic.”
President, California Land Surveyors Association
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Hands off God, again. Part 6

In matters of Religion, I have considered that it’s free exercise is placed by the constitution independant of the powers of the general government. I have therefore undertaken, on no occasion, to prescribe the religious exercises suited to it: but have left them, as the constitution found them, under the direction & discipline of the state or church authorities acknoleged by the several religious societies.
Second Inaugural Address, March 4, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Strict constructionist leaders take the Constitution at its word.
This single paragraph in its entirety sums up Thomas Jefferson’s views on the national government’s role in religion:
1. The Constitution set religion apart as independent of that government.
2. Accordingly, he authorized no national days of prayer, fasting or thanksgiving.
3. Religious observances were left to state or church authorities.

The word “again” appears in this headline, referencing a 2013 post with the same subject and title.

“You put a great amount of effort into this talk …
a lot of research into medical practice in the 18th century.”
Clinical Laboratory Management Association, Central New York Chapter
Mr. Jefferson goes to great lengths to be relevant to your audience.
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In this case, size DOES matter. Part 5

I know that the acquisition of Louisiana has been disapproved by some, from a candid apprehension that the enlargement of our territory would endanger it’s union. but who can limit the extent to which the federative principle may operate effectively? the larger our association, the less will it be shaken by local passions. and in any view, is it not better that the opposite bank of the Missisipi should be settled by our own brethren & children than by strangers of another family? with which should we be most likely to live in harmony and friendly intercourse?
Thomas Jefferson’s Second Inaugural Address, March 4, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Far-sighted leaders see bright spots in the distance!
There was opposition from political opponents, the Federalists, to the President’s purchase of Louisiana in 1803, over its cost and constitutionality. Others were honestly concerned (“a candid apprehension”) that doubling the country’s size might destabilize it. Jefferson thought just the opposite, that a larger nation would be more stable, less vulnerable to parochial interests, what he called “local passions.”
Regardless, there was other good reasons for the enlargement. The Mississippi River was now entirely within U.S. jurisdiction, so farmers could ship their goods to market without interference. In addition, those on the western bank of that river would not be “strangers of another family,” the French, Spanish, English or Russian, for all had designs on that vast territory. No, those people would now be fellow citizens, “our own brethren and children.”

“Again, THANK YOU.
Your historical portrayal of Thomas Jefferson was both engaging and insightful.”

General Manager, Oklahoma Gas Association
Engaging! Insightful!
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War is only an interruption of doing good. Part 4

if injustice by ourselves or others must sometimes produce war, increased as the same revenue will be by increased population & consumption, & aided by other resources reserved for that crisis, it may meet within the year all the expences of the year, without encroaching on the rights of future generations by burthening them with the debts of the past. War will then be but a suspension of useful works; & a return to a state of peace a return to the progress of improvement.
Thomas Jefferson’s Second Inaugural Address, March 4, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Realistic leaders know great conflicts are just around the corner.
Thomas Jefferson outlined in the previous post how peacetime taxes should be spent. In this continuation, he deals with wartime spending.

First, spending on “useful [domestic] works” must be suspended. An increasing population with increasing consumer demands should boost federal revenues. Added to those funds would be money previously set aside to be used only in a time of war. Those two sources should allow war to be conducted on a pay-as-you-go basis. Regardless, war was not to be funded with debt that would burden future generations.

When peace returned, government could once again resume spending on “useful works,” i.e. domestic improvements.

“You most definitely played an integral role in making our awards ceremony
a special evening for everyone in attendance.”
Superintendent, Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, National Park Service
Mr. Jefferson can be integral in the success of your meeting.
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THIS is how Uncle Sam should spend your taxes. Part 3

these contributions enable us to support the current expences of the government, to fulfill contracts with foreign nations, to extinguish the native right of soil within our limits, to extend those limits, & to apply such a surplus to our public debts, as places at a short day their final redemption. and, that redemption once effected, the revenue thereby liberated may, by a just repartition of it among the states, & a corresponding amendment of the constitution, be applied, in time of peace, to rivers, canals, roads, arts, manufactures, education, & other great objects within each state.
Thomas Jefferson’s Second Inaugural Address, March 4, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Effective leaders limit and prioritize spending.
First, Thomas Jefferson limited current federal spending to five areas:
1. Domestic commitments authorized by Congress
2. Contractual agreements with other nations
3. Purchasing tribal lands from the Indians
4. Expansion of the United States geographically
5. Paying down federal debt until it was gone

Second, when the federal debt had been paid, the Constitution amended to allow for it, and the nation was at peace, further surpluses were to be shared with the states for infrastructure and to promote commerce, education, culture and the like.

“The great length that Patrick Lee went to ensure that Mr. Jefferson’s remarks
were relevant to today’s officials was excellent.”
Executive Director, Township Officials of Illinois
Patrick Lee and Thomas Jefferson collaborate well.
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Tax man? WHAT tax man? Part 2

The remaining revenue, on the consumption of foreign articles, is paid chiefly by those who can afford to add foreign luxuries to domestic comforts. being collected on our sea-board and frontiers only, & incorporated with the transactions of our mercantile citizens, it may be the pleasure and the pride of an American to ask What farmer, what mechanic, what labourer ever sees a tax-gatherer of the US.?
Thomas Jefferson’s Second Inaugural Address, March 4, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Successful leaders should brag (a little).
This paragraph continues the theme of the previous post, the President’s elimination of unnecessary government offices, officers and the taxes to support them. Where, then, did government get the funds for necessary functions? From taxes (customs duties) imposed on imported goods.

Most customs were paid by the more affluent, those who could afford imported “foreign luxuries.” The cost of necessary services were funded for everyone by the few who could really afford it. That left the  vast majority of ordinary citizens … farmers, mechanics, laborers … free from the grasp of the tax man.

“Thank you for your thoughtful and encouraging words
on leadership, change and the challenges for our future.”
Communications and Education Director, Illinois Municipal League
Mr. Jefferson will encourage and challenge your audience!
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We cut government w-a-y back. Taxes, too. Part 1

At home, fellow-citizens …  the suppression of unnecessary offices, of useless establishments and expences, enabled us to discontinue our internal taxes. these covering our land with officers, & opening our doors to their intrusions, had already begun that process of domiciliary vexation, which, once entered, is scarcely to be restrained from reaching successively every article of property & produce.
Thomas Jefferson’s Second Inaugural Address, March 4, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Smart leaders sometimes do LESS, not MORE.
The President reported to the Congress on progress made during his first term. After a paragraph devoted to pursuing open and friendly relations with all like-minded nations, he turned his attention to domestic affairs.

Previous administrations had expanded the role of government and the taxes necessary to support it. Jefferson took the opposite position during his first four years, cutting unnecessary offices, expenses, and taxes . No longer were there “internal taxes,” ones levied by the government on its own citizens. Gone as well were the tax collectors interfering with citizens’ personal lives, or “domiciliary vexation.”  If those practices were not curtailed, the government’s appetite would eventually tax “every article of property & produce,” i.e. everything you own and everything you make.

“The educational experience he offers is of great value to audiences of all ages.”
Executive Director, National Coal Transportation Association
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I admire smart women!

Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mrs Warren & returns her the paper she had been pleased to inclose to him with his own subscription & that of the heads of departments … he learns with great satisfaction that mrs Warren’s attention has been so long turned to the events which have been passing. the last thirty years will furnish a more instructive lesson to mankind than any equal period known in history. he has no doubt the work she has prepared will be equally useful to our country & honourable to herself.
Thomas Jefferson to Mercy Otis Warren, February 8, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Empowering leaders encourage the marginalized.
The Massachusetts born Warren (1728-1814) was a strong supporter of American independence. She wrote prolifically on its behalf but always under a pen name, since female authors were almost unheard of. In 1790, she published a book of poems and plays under her own name. In 1805, she completed a three volume history of the United States, the first written by a woman.

It is that history Thomas Jefferson referenced in this letter. He was buying copies of her work for himself and his cabinet members. He had no doubt her seminal work would “be equally useful to our country and honourable to herself.”

“Your presentation was totally amazing
to our group from Mexico, Canada and the U.S.”
Program Chair, International Hunter  Education Conference
Let your audience be amazed.
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Green space urban design will lessen disease.

…the yellow fever …is generated only in low close, and ill-cleansed parts of a town, I have supposed it practicable to prevent it’s generation by building our cities on a more open plan. take for instance the chequer board for a plan. let the black squares only be building squares, and the white ones be left open, in turf & trees. every square of houses will be surrounded by four open squares, & every house will front an open square. the atmosphere of such a town would be like that of the country, insusceptible of the miasmata which produce yellow fever. I have accordingly proposed that the enlargements of the city of New Orleans … shall be on this plan.
To Constantin François Chasseboeuf Volney, February 8, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Compassionate leaders promote public health.
Thomas Jefferson met the French philosopher Volney (1757-1820) during his service in France. More than half of this lengthy, wide-ranging letter dealt with the ravages of yellow fever in coastal America. Jefferson fled swampy Washington for Monticello every August and September, when the disease was prominent.

Jefferson presumed the disease flourished because of crowded, unhealthy living conditions in large cities, all in the Atlantic tidewater region. To combat this, he proposed a plan for future urban expansion that would leave half of every development in green space. Using the example of a checkerboard, he suggested all squares of one color for homes, all squares of the other color to be left natural. Every house on the block would front on open space.

It would be long after Jefferson’s death before the cause of yellow fever was discovered. It wasn’t the crowded swampy atmosphere along the coast, but the mosquitoes that thrived in that environment.

“… you received the highest “quality of presenter” rating
in the conference evaluations … no keynote has ever done this before.”
Founder, Lanit Consulting/Foliotek EPIC Conference
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