Tag Archives: Jefferson Leadership

Get these nutjob women off my back!

I have for some time been pestered with letters & packages from two women of the name of Bampfield whom I never saw or heard of & must suppose to be mad. I have just recieved the inclosed packet. from the daughter … the mother [may be] in Baltimore, I wish to return to her, without looking into it’s contents, in order to put an end to the correspondence. perhaps the letter carriers of your office may be able to find her. if not the letters may take the usual course of unclaimed letters. I have left the packet open to give you an idea of the writer …
From Thomas Jefferson to Charles Burrall, August 9, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
No leader likes being stalked.
Burrall was Postmaster of Baltimore. The President had “been pestered” by repeated unwanted correspondence from a mother and daughter, one of whom might live in Baltimore. He didn’t know the women but from their writings thought they must “be mad.” He asked Burrall’s help in returning the letters to their source, hoping to end the nuisance.

He invited Burrall to review the letters and form his own opinion.

“Your presentation as Thomas Jefferson of the
“Seven Reasons Why Revolutions Succeed”

was very well received.”
EVP, American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science
Mr. Jefferson has relevant wisdom for your audience.
Invite him to speak. Call 573-657-2739
NOTE: The link to Thomas Jefferson’s letter is subject to change by Founders’ Archive. It was accurate when this post was written. If the link is now wrong, search FoundersArchives.gov or call me. I’ll help you find it.
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I need everyone’s opinions!

General Dearborne has seen all the papers. I will ask the favor of you to communicate them to mr Gallatin & mr Smith—from mr Gallatin I shall ask his first opinions, preparatory to the stating formal questions for our ultimate decision.
Thomas Jefferson to James Madison, August 7, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Smart leaders know five heads are better than one.
The President was circulating a packet of correspondence and papers regarding a failed diplomatic effort toward Spain. He needed to formulate a new policy toward that nation that also considered U.S. relations with England and the rest of Europe.

Jefferson suggested what he thought that policy might be. He wanted the opinions of all his cabinet: Madison, Secretary of State; Dearborne, Secretary of War; Gallatin, Secretary of the Treasury; and Smith, Secretary of the Navy. (The Attorney General’s office was vacant.)

With their opinions in hand, he would formulate a final list of questions they would all consider before he drafted the nation’s position. Even that summation would be subject to their review and comment. He wanted his administration to speak with a single, unified voice.

“Patrick was a pleasure to work with … professional, timely, and accurate …”
Conference and Travel Manager, Kansas City Life Insurance Company
Thomas Jefferson will be a pleasure to work with, too.
Invite him to speak to your audience. Call 573-657-2739
NOTE: The link to Thomas Jefferson’s letter is subject to change by Founders’ Archive. It was accurate when this post was written. If the link is now wrong, search FoundersArchives.gov or call me. I’ll help you find it.
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Patrick Henry, good and bad

were I to give his character in general terms, it would be of mixed aspect. I think he was the best humored man in society I almost ever knew, and the greatest orator that ever lived. he had a consummate knolege of the human heart, which directing the efforts of his eloquence enabled him to attain a degree of popularity with the people at large never perhaps equalled. his judgment in other matters was inaccurate in matters of law it was not worth a copper: he was avaritious & rotten hearted. his two great passions were the love of money & of fame: but when these came into competition the former predominated.
Thomas Jefferson to William Wirt, August 4, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Even-handed leaders acknowledge both virtues and faults.
Wirt (1772-1834) was a lawyer, writer and public official. He was collecting memories of the late Patrick Henry, who died in 1799.  Wirt knew of the lengthy, contentious relationship between Henry and Jefferson and asked the latter’s opinion, “His faults, as well as his virtues.”

Jefferson began with Henry’s virtues. He
1. Was a very social man.
2. Was the greatest orator in history.
3. Understood the human heart very well.
4. Coupled that understanding with his eloquence to achieve a very high level of popularity.

And then his faults:
1. He lacked good judgment.
2. His legal knowledge was worthless.
3. He was greedy and mean-spirited.
4. He loved both money and fame.
5. When he could not have both, he chose money.

Jefferson offered this candid assessment only because the trustworthy Wirt asked for it, promised no one would read it but himself, and the letter would be returned to its author.

Two years later, the President appointed Wirt to be the prosecutor in Aaron Burr’s treason trial. President Monroe would appoint Wirt to be Attorney General in 1817, a position he would hold for a dozen years.

“Your presentation, particularly your response to questions, was most impressive.”
Member, Program Committee, American College of Real Estate Lawyers
Mr. Jefferson enjoys a rousing Q&A session after his remarks!
Invite him to speak. Call 573-657-2739
NOTE: The link to Thomas Jefferson’s letter is subject to change by Founders’ Archive. It was accurate when this post was written. If the link is now wrong, search FoundersArchives.gov or call me. I’ll help you find it.
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I suffered no ill effects, but my horses did!

I had the hottest journey I ever went through in my life, & the most distressing to my horses. a thunder shower caught us in an uninhabited road, and we were travelling an hour & a half in it, the water falling in solid sheets. in five minutes from the beginning every drop that fell pierced to the skin. I have felt no inconvenience from it.
Thomas Jefferson to John Barnes, July 20, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Should leaders suffer like their constituents?
Barnes was a friend and Philadelphia merchant who handled some of Jefferson’s financial transactions. A letter than began about money ended with the weather.

Jefferson had just returned to Monticello, beginning his annual two month absence from Washington City and its late summer scourge of the yellow fever. Several days before in another letter, he reported temperatures in the mid-90s, and that he would delay his trip if cooler weather had not arrived. Apparently, his eagerness to see his family outweighed his concerns about the temperature.

Jefferson didn’t mind hot weather, but it was “most distressing to my horses.”  In addition to heat, they were deluged by a 90- minute thunderstorm that soaked everyone completely in the first five minutes. (He was traveling in a horse-drawn, topless carriage.) He concluded the trip had “no inconvenience,” for him, i.e. no ill-effects, health wise.

“…Patrick Lee gave a very impressive performance
for the National Unemployment Insurance Tax Conference …”
Director, Missouri Division of Employment Security
Thomas Jefferson will impress your audience!
Invite him to speak. Call 573-657-2739

NOTE: The link to Thomas Jefferson’s letter is subject to change by Founders’ Archive. It was accurate when this post was written. If the link is now wrong, search FoundersArchives.gov or call me. I’ll help you find it.

 

 

 

ltr about finances

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Fake news, on steroids!

Accounts five & thirty years, since the Date of this Transaction, spent in the regular Discharge of public, & private Duties, with an Uniformity of Tenor which I am not afraid to rest on the Verdict of those who have been known me—
They will judge of me by my whole Life, & not by a single false Step taken at the Commencement of it
To you I have said these Things, because I have known you from our early youth, & wish to stand approved by you—
Thomas Jefferson to William Fitzhugh, Jr. July 1, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Wise leaders reassure friends who might have reason to doubt.
Fitzhugh (1741-1809) was a Virginia plantation owner, statesman, and life-long friend of Jefferson’s, who was responding to newspaper accounts alleging multiple accounts of his immoral behavior. Specifically, Jefferson addressed a charge regarding his improper conduct toward a neighbor’s wife in 1768 or ’69. He acknowledged the truth of that charge, then laid out his defense:
1. For 35 years, he had conducted his public and private life with a “Uniformity of Tenor.”
2. He did not fear the verdict of those who knew him well.
3. They would judge him by the whole of his life, not by a single youthful indiscretion.
4. You (Fitzhugh) are one of those who’ve known me since my youth, and I care what you think about me.

Another letter written the same day was the subject of a 2016 post. It dealt with this subject but in a more detailed manner. In essence, by admitting to the Walker indiscretion, Jefferson denied the allegations regarding Sally Hemings.

 “The city officials were captivated …
and would have posed questions for another hour if time had been available.”
Executive Director, Missouri Municipal League
Invite Thomas Jefferson to speak.
Call 573-657-2739
NOTE: The link to Thomas Jefferson’s letter is subject to change by Founders’ Archive. It was accurate when this post was written. If the link is now wrong, search FoundersArchives.gov or call me. I’ll help you find it.
2 Comments Posted in Human nature, Morality, Sally Hemings, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , , , , , , |

It’s about time! First we’ve heard of him in 13 months!

we have just heard from Capt. Lewis, who wintered 1600. miles up the Missouri; all well. 45. chiefs of 6. different nations from that quarter are forwarded by him to St. Louis on their way to this place. our agent at St. Louis will endeavor to prevail on them to stay there till autumn & then come on. should they insist on coming immediately they will arrive in July, & may derange my departure.
Thomas Jefferson to Martha Jefferson Randolph, June 24, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Communication between leaders used to take a LONG time!
The President covered a number of topics in this letter to his daughter. One was receiving the first report from Meriwether Lewis since May 1804, when the Corps of Discovery departed St. Louis for the western sea. They had wintered with the Mandan Indians on the northern plains. In April, 1805, when the ice cleared on the Mississippi, most of the Corps headed west. Fifteen of the men, though, navigated the keelboat back to St. Louis, with all the plant and animal specimens collected to date. Their trove included a live prairie dog, which eventually made it all the way to Washington City!

In addition to specimens, Lewis had persuaded a number of Indian chiefs to return with the keelboat and journey on to Washington to meet the President.

The original plans for the Corps called for them to send another contingent home when they reached the mountains. Jefferson expected a second report, which never came. At the Rocky Mountains, the challenge ahead seemed so arduous that Lewis and Clark were unwilling to diminish their manpower.

Lack of a second report caused practically all to give up on the Corps, believing them to have perished somewhere in the great unknown west of the Mandan villages. Jefferson maintained confidence in Lewis for their safe return. It would be 16 more months before that confidence was rewarded by Lewis’ next letter, written from St. Louis in late September, 1806.

“I highly recommend Mr. Lee for both formal and informal presentations: …”
Executive Director, Missouri Humanities Council
Mr. Jefferson and I come well-recommended!
Invite us to speak. Call 573-657-2739
NOTE: The link to Thomas Jefferson’s letter is subject to change by Founders’ Archive. It was accurate when this post was written. If the link is now wrong, search FoundersArchives.gov or call me. I’ll help you find it.
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Can you believe this man’s gall?!

the father [Robert Gamble] asked from me a letter of introduction to you. I was the more surprised at this, as his federalism had distinguished itself by personal hostility to me … yet having made the request, I felt myself bound in delicacy to give him a civil answer … of the young man I know nothing … he [the father] has two sisters married to two most estimable republicans, for whom I have great friendship … I will ask your notice of mr Gamble [the son] & even that you will let him know I had done so. the father even asked a letter of credit for his son: but this I declined. he the father has been twice bankrupt, tho’ is now deemed in good circumstances: but has never been deemed delicate in his pecuniary [financial] dealings.
Thomas Jefferson to John Armstrong, Jr., June 21, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Sometimes a leader just has to suck it up and be cordial to jerks.
The immediate previous post was Jefferson’s letter to Gamble, who had requested letters of introduction and a line of credit for his European-bound 23 year old son. Armstrong, serving as a U.S. diplomat in England, now received one of those introductions. He was also received very interesting background information!

The father who had requested the favors not only was Jefferson’s political opponent in Virginia but had shown “personal hostility” to him! Yet, Gamble had two sisters married to “estimable republicans” who were close friends of his. But for this, Jefferson might have ignored Gamble’s brazen request, but “delicacy” required of him “a civil answer.”

In light of the line of credit, which Jefferson denied, he pointed out that the father had been bankrupt twice. Like father, line son?

“I …[thought] having Mr. Jefferson as our conference keynote in Richmond
at The Hotel Jefferson would be ideal, and it was!”
EVP, Carolina-Virginias Telephone Membership Association
Mr. Jefferson has spoken in far less impressive places than the 5-Star Jefferson Hotel!
Invite him to speak. Call 573-657-2739
NOTE: The link to Thomas Jefferson’s letter is subject to change by Founders’ Archive. It was accurate when this post was written. If the link is now wrong, search FoundersArchives.gov or call me. I’ll help you find it.
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Thomas Jefferson, in a nutshell

I love industry & abhor severity.
Thomas Jefferson to John Strode, June 5, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
These are two very good qualities for any leader.
Strode was one of several people whose help Jefferson sought in finding a replacement for his competent but over-priced manager at Monticello. Strode was a long-time friend, and the President occasionally spent the night at his home when he traveled between Monticello and Washington City. This letter, like the others, described the many duties of an overseer.

In the middle of this letter are these six words that capture the heart of Thomas Jefferson. He loved kind, industrious people. He could have described himself the same way. He was unfailingly thoughtful and always on-task. In a letter to his daughter (one I can’t find at the moment), he advised her how much a person could accomplish if they were not wasting time but always doing something productive.

One concern Jefferson had about his current overseer, Gabriel Lilley, was his occasional severity toward the slaves. Jefferson wanted none of it. He hated that kind of behavior, whether toward his servants or anyone else.

“Patrick Lee is a professional …
easy to work with … and very effective …”
Director, Living History Associates, Richmond, Virginia
Sound good to you?
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NOTE: The link to Thomas Jefferson’s letter is subject to change by Founders’ Archive. It was accurate when this post was written. If the link is now wrong, search FoundersArchives.gov or call me. I’ll help you find it. 
Leave a comment Posted in Personal preferences, Slavery Tagged , , , , , , , , , |

When I get paid, you will get paid.

Messrs. Gibson & Jefferson having had my tobacco in their hands for sale a considerable time, I have been in the constant expectation of sending you an order on them for one thousand dollars … by a late letter from them I find they have not yet been able to sell for a reasonable price. the object of the present is therefore merely to assure you that so soon as they shall have sold the tobacco I shall forward you such an order on them.
Thomas Jefferson to James Lyle, June 3, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
All leaders have their blind spots.
Wheat and tobacco were the only cash crops available to most Virginia farmers. Jefferson would transport his tobacco to Richmond, with instructions to his business agents, Gibson & Jefferson, on when to sell it and for what price.

Perhaps it was his unrelenting financial pressures that regularly caused Jefferson to over-estimate the size of his crops and the price they would command. He was continually on the spot to pay his debts from the sale of tobacco. In this excerpt, he was unable to honor a commitment to pay $1,000 toward a debt to an old friend because his tobacco hadn’t sold at what Jefferson considered “a reasonable price.” He promised to pay as soon as it sold.

There is some indication that payment had been due for several years. Nearly seven months later, Lyle, himself in financial distress, still had not received the money owed him.

“… your portrayal of Thomas Jefferson …
was definitely one of the highlights of our annual event.”
Executive Director, Nevada Association of Counties
Let Mr. Jefferson highlight your event!
Invite him to speak. Call 573-657-2739
NOTE: The link to Thomas Jefferson’s letter is subject to change by Founders’ Archive. It was accurate when this post was written. If the link is now wrong, search FoundersArchives.gov or call me. I’ll help you find it.
Leave a comment Posted in Agriculture, Debt Tagged , , , , , , , , , , |

“Fake news” is as old as the hills. And it appears to be true!

you will see in the papers an extra letter of Elliott’s of extraordinary aspect. it contains some absolute untruths. but what is most remarkeable is that expressions are so put together as to be literally true when strictly considered & analysed, and yet to convey to 99 readers out of 100. the most absolute & mischievous falsehoods. it is a most insidious attempt to cover [conceal] his own opinions & passions … and to fill with inquietude the republicans who have not the means of good information.
Thomas Jefferson to John Wayles Eppes, May 27, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Manipulative leaders also manipulate the facts.
The content of Elliott’s letter in the newspapers is unknown as is the identity of Elliott himself. It may have been Vermont Congressman James Elliott. The President alerted his widowed son-in-law and Congressman about the that content.

This Elliott published “some absolute untruths” presented in such a manner as to appear “to be literally true,” with the effect of deceiving almost everybody. He did it in such a way to conceal his own interests while causing “inquietude [restlessness]” among faithful republicans, the President’s supporters, who had no way of discerning the truth.

“The folks really admire the ease and friendliness you show.
They were impressed with your wealth of knowledge and enthusiasm …”
Tour Director, Foretravel Motor Club
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NOTE: The link to Thomas Jefferson’s letter is subject to change by Founders’ Archive. It was accurate when this post was written. If the link is now wrong, search FoundersArchives.gov or call me. I’ll help you find it.
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