Tag Archives: Kosciuszko

We said we would do it, and we kept our word!

the session of the first congress, convened since republicanism has recovered it’s ascendancy [in the election of 1800], is now drawing to a close. they will pretty compleatly fulfil all the desires of the people … the people are nearly all united, their quondam [former, i.e. Federalist] leaders infuriated with the sense of their impotence … and all is now tranquil, firm and well as it should be. I add no signature because unnecessary for you.
To Tadeusz Kosciuszko, April 2, 1802

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
A measure of true leadership is accomplishing what you said you would do.
With the republicans (small r) in control of the Congress and Presidency, they worked together to accomplish the goals Jefferson had laid before the people. Deleted from this excerpt, but available in full at the link above, those successes were:
1. Reduced the army and navy to only what was necessary for defense
2. Curtailed the President’s patronage powers and cut Executive Branch offices in half.
3. Suppressed taxes on ordinary citizens
4. Economized in a way that would still honor payments on the national debt and eliminate that debt in 18 years
5. Reduced the size of the judicial branch, enlarged pre-1801 to increase Federalist power
6. Welcomed refugees from other countries
7. Eliminated all public governmental ceremonies patterned after England’s

Jefferson claimed near unity of the citizenry, to the fury of their former leaders.

He didn’t sign this letter, saying Kosciuszko would know who wrote it. There was another reason. Political opponents regularly pilfered the mails. Since Jefferson apparently could not send this letter by private courier, his preferred method, he would omit his name so his straightforward assertions could not be used against him.

“Thank you so much for the great job you did as Thomas Jefferson …
I really appreciated the way you did the research on our association.”
Missouri Mappers Association
Mr. Jefferson will research your interests to make the best presentation possible.
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I wish I could tell you yes, but the answer is no.

… [you wish to] know whether some officers of your country could expect to be employed in this country … I hasten to inform you that we are now actually engaged in reducing our military establishment one third, and discharging one third of our officers. we keep in service no more than men enough to garrison the small posts dispersed at great distances on our frontiers … thus circumstanced you will percieve the entire impossibility of providing for the persons you recommend. I wish it had been in my power to give you a more favorable answer; but next to the fulfilling your wishes, the most grateful thing I can do is to give a faithful answer
To Tadeusz Kosciuszko, April 2, 1802

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Leaders cannot honor all patronage requests, even from close friends.
Jefferson’s freedom fighter friend from Revolutionary War days sought employment in America’s army for fellow military officers from Poland. Jefferson could not accommodate his old friend.

True to his pledge to shrink the national government, Jefferson and Congress were reducing the size of its army and its officer corps by 1/3. There were no jobs to be had.

Since the President could not grant his friend’s request, the next best thing to do for him was to explain the issue truthfully.

“Thank you for participating in the first ParkPalooza …
at the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial. The event was a success …”

Superintendent, National Park Service, U.S. Department of Interior
Mr. Jefferson’s participation will contribute greatly to the success of your event.
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I loaned YOUR money to ME.

… From this portion of my personal condition, I must turn to another of unpleasant hue, and apologize to you for what has given me much mortification … [a debt of] ten or twelve thousand Dollars … [what my agent] mr Barnes suggested that … the 4500.D. of yours … would entirely relieve my remaining deficiency. the proposition was like a beam of light; & I was satisfied that were you on the spot to be consulted the kindness of your heart would be gratified, while recieving punctually the interest for your own subsistence, to let the principal be so disposed of for a time, as to lift a friend out of distress …
To Tadeusz Kosciuszko, February 26, 1810

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
A debt-burdened leader is a conflicted leader.
Jefferson ended his long letter with an embarrassing admission. While he had hoped to finish his Presidency with his personal debt near zero, he found he still owed $10-12,000. His friend, President Madison, co-signed for 2/3 of that debt, but he had no access to more credit.

Jefferson was executor for the American portion of Koscuiszko’s estate when the Pole returned to Europe. At his death, that money was to free and educate slaves, and Jefferson was to make sure it happened. In the meantime, the money was invested.

The indebted former President, at his business agent’s suggestion, loaned Koscuiszko’s money to himself. He rationalized that Koscuiszko didn’t care who paid his interest, so long as it was paid. The principal of the estate covered the remainder of Jefferson’s large debt.

The Polish leader replied, “I approve of everything that you have done with my fund. I have complete confidence in you. I only ask that the interest be paid regularly …”

Koscuiszko later wrote other wills which conflicted with the one governing his American estate. He died in 1817, and Jefferson could not probate the slavery-relief funds. They remained part of his indebtedness and were never used for their intended purpose. Koscuizsko’s complicated estate wasn’t finally settled until several decades after Jefferson’s death in 1826.

“The California Chamber of Commerce would highly recommend you …”
President, California (MO) Chamber of Commerce
Once your audience has enjoyed Mr. Jefferson, you will recommend him highly, too.
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