Tag Archives: Speaker

What do we do in the worst-case-scenario?

other Questions to be considered, in the event of a British cruiser falling in with the vessel in which mr Harvie will be.
1. shall he throw the papers overboard on his vessel being brought to? or trust to an examination in hopes of liberation.
2. if detained, shall he deliver the stock to liberate his vessel? shall he accompany the stock to England? or abandon it & carry to Paris the information of what has happened?
To Albert Gallatin, January 24, 1804

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Wise leaders plan for unpleasant possibilities.
Lewis Harvie, the President’s private secretary (who succeeded Meriwether Lewis), was to carry $11.25 million in stock to France for the purchase of Louisiana. How to get him safely there was a serious consideration when British ships were harassing, boarding and sometimes capturing foreign vessels or their passengers.
Jefferson directed Secretary of the Treasury Gallatin to inquire about all passages available on American ships leaving Baltimore or New York for Europe. He was to look for routes that went south of England to the Continent, rather than ones going through the English Channel, were British ships abounded. Harvie would arrive in the American port anonymously and on short notice, book his passage and leave.
If all that failed, and Harvie’s ship was stopped by the British, the President proposed five questions to be answered before that worst-case-scenario unfolded.

“Your presence …
helped make the inauguration evening ceremonies
even more special.”
President, Board of Directors, Cole County Historical Society
Let Mr. Jefferson enhance the special character of your meeting.
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It’s fake news, my friend. (But I won’t say so publicly.)

those especially who read the Gazette of the US. need to be set to rights, for in the long  statement which appeared in that paper about a week ago, there was not one single fact which was not false …
the Gazette of the US. is evidence of this [opposition] … 4. pages of solid matter … & the whole so false and malignant, as shews it is prepared for the purpose of exportation, and to poison the minds of foreign countries against their own, which is too well informed to drink of the dose.
To William Short, January 23, 1804

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Strong opposition from some of the press comes to all leaders.
The previous post, from a letter to Jefferson’s daughter, dealt with diplomatic offense taken when he did not show favoritism to British and Spanish representatives at private dinners. In this long letter to a trusted friend, Jefferson explained the conflict in much greater detail.

He was particularly concerned about a report in an opposition newspaper, the Gazette of the United States, claiming every single fact in the account to be wrong. The entirety of the paper was “so false and malignant” that its only purpose was “to poison the minds of foreign countries” against the United States. Affirming confidence in his countrymen, he said Americans were “too well informed” to drink that poison.

Jefferson regularly shared strong opinions in his correspondence with trusted friends but almost never did so publicly, where he maintained an even-handed cordiality. Yet, he wanted to reassure those who knew him well with the benefit of his thinking, to combat what opponents thought of him.

“The “Dinner with Thomas Jefferson” … was a huge success…
Your command of Mr. Jefferson’s persona and mind,
and your facility in answering complex questions were impressive.”
Chairman, “3 Flags Festival,” The Louisiana Purchase Bicentennial
Let Mr. Jefferson contribute to the success of your event.
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We are all equal here. Fooey on them!

On Friday Congress give a dinner on the acquisition of Louisiana. they determine to invite no foreign ministers, to avoid questions of etiquette, in which we are enveloped by Merry’s & Yrujo’s families. … [their conflict will continue] until they recieve orders from their courts to acquiesce in our principles of the equality of all persons meeting together in society, & not to expect to force us into their principles of allotment into ranks & orders.
To Martha Jefferson Randolph, January 23, 1804

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Just leaders do not show favoritism, especially when it is expected.
President Jefferson disdained the aristocratic expectations of England’s and Spain’s ambassadors to America. They insisted on favored treatment and were incensed not to receive it. Thus, they were excluded from a Congressional dinner.

Although Jefferson wished his elder daughter could be with him in Washington City, it was better for her that she was absent. His Cabinet Secretary’s wives had already been abused in the press for not fawning over the ambassadors’ wives. His daughter would receive even worse treatment from foes who wanted to distress him.

The President was clear. Other nations:
– Must acquiesce to America’s equality for all in society.
– Should keep their privileged society, “allotment into ranks & orders,” to themselves.

“…everyone enjoys/learns/benefits/grows from the presentations of Patrick Lee.
Reach out to him … You will never regret it!”
Chief, Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma
The Chief is right!
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1 Comment Posted in Congress, Diplomacy Tagged , , , , , , , , |

We agree on three essential principles!

The satisfaction which you express …  with the substitution of economy for taxation, & the progress and prospect exhibited of the discharge of our public debt within a convenient period, is a proof of that soundness of [your] political principle … the preference you give to the late acquisition of territory by just & peaceable means, rather than by rapine & bloodshed, is in the genuine spirit of that primitive Christianity, which so peculiarly inculcated the doctrines of peace, justice, and good will to all mankind.
To the Portsmouth, Virginia Baptist Society, January 20, 1804

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
All leaders appreciate an atta-boy!
In a November 1803 letter to the President, the Society expressed their appreciation for the direction of the new government. Jefferson acknowledged their thank-you and reiterated three areas of agreement:
1. Better for government to do less rather than tax more.
2. Prudent to have a specific plan for paying off the national debt.
3. Acquiring Louisiana by diplomacy and not war demonstrated “that primitive Christianity” characterized by “peace, justice and good will to all mankind.”

“As a surprise guest speaker,
“Mr. Jefferson” captured and enthralled our bankers night after night.”
Executive Vice President, Missouri Bankers Association
Let Mr. Jefferson enthrall your audience!
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No thanks, but thanks.

The information first recieved as to the bed of Sulphur at Genesee was certainly such as to interest the government and make it our duty to enquire into it. this has been done. the result is that there is at the spring not more than a ton of sulphur formed … we do not think it an object for the government to intermeddle with: at the same time we give you just credit for the readiness you have shewn to accomodate the public with the purchase, had it been expedient for them to buy.
To Mountjoy Bayly, January 5, 1804

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Careful leaders must discern the motives of seemingly helpful people.
Bayly was a Revolutionary War veteran from Maryland and a not-too-successful businessman and Federalist politician. In his first letter to the President, he offered to sell land containing a sulfur spring. Sulfur was a component in gunpowder, and a ready supply was necessary for the nation’s defense. Claiming the British were about to buy that land, he bought it instead, ostensibly to secure it for the United States.

In a second letter, Bayly attempted to clarify some controversy about the quantity and quality of the sulfur at the spring. Then, in a self-pitying way, he claimed selling this land was essential for the provision of his “large, young, helpless, and friendless family.”

Jefferson’s courteous reply explained that an investigation indicated only a small supply of sulfur, not a large one that would have been of great interest to the nation. As such, it did not merit the government’s involvement. Nonetheless, Jefferson thanked a political opponent for his offer of help.

Left unsaid by the President was that the nation was not in the business of rescuing people from their own poor choices.

“A friend of mine heard Patrick Lee speak to the Pennsylvania Society of Land Surveyors
and was captivated by his presentation. She recommended him to me.
The decision to bring Patrick Lee was a wise one.”
Chairman and CEO, Schoor DePalma, Manalapan, NJ
Mr. Jefferson will captivate your audience!
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Cash out & in, 1804, plus sad news

Jan. 1                   Gave in charity 5.D. [$5]. …
Feb. 13                 Paid for 13. glass pens 2.43 3/4. …
Mar. 28                Sent Mrs. Madison for a mantua [lady’s dress] maker 3.50. …
Apr. 3                   Culpepper C.H. [Court House] oats & etc. .58.   barber .50…
May 13                 Thomas Shields for finding pistol   .1.D…
June 7                  Gibson & Jefferson have sold my tobo [tobacco]… 1267.D.
July 20                 Pd. S.H. Smith for newspapers 10.D. …
Aug. 30                Pd. shoeing horses at Mr. Madison’s 1. …
Sept. 14                Recd. of J. Barnes 500.D. …
Oct. 31                  Tooth pick case 1.75. …
Nov. 13                 Paid at the races 1.D. …
Dec. 10                 Recd. back from Jos. Daugherty 3.50 overpaid [for] contingencies.
Memorandum Books, 1804

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Careful leaders keep a record. (They should also keep a balance.)
The link above lists all of Jefferson’s expenditures and receipts for 1804. I excerpted one entry from the 50 or so listed for each month. These are not meant to be representative but to illustrate a variety of money coming and going.

Mr. Jefferson was an avid list maker. He would have jotted these amounts day-by-day during the year and summarized them all at year’s end. I have read (but cannot verify) that while he kept a careful record of every expense, he never struck a total at the end of the month or year, never a profit or loss statement, never an accounting of his net worth. Had he done so, he might have been more aware that his general financial health was slowly deteriorating through the years. He died deeply in debt.

Not all entries concerned money. On April 17, after recording a payment of $156.67 for corn, he also noted, ” This morning between 8. & 9. aclock my dear daughter Maria Eppes died.”

“Patrick Lee … as Thomas Jefferson … is obviously a very talented person
and did a great job of putting our regulatory burden in perspective.”
President & CEO, Citizens National Bank
Mr. Jefferson and I together will make a great addition to your meeting.
Invite us to speak. Call 573-657-2739
1 Comment Posted in Debt, Family matters, Grief & loss Tagged , , , , , , , , |

Smoke ’em if you got ’em? (NO!)

I now lay before Congress the annual account of the fund established for defraying the Contingent [random, unforseeable] charges of government. No occasion having arisen for making use of any part of it in the present year, the balance of eighteen thousand five hundred and sixty dollars, unexpended at the end of the last year, remains now in the Treasury.
To the Senate and House of Representatives of the US. of America, December 31, 1803

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Self-limiting leaders exercise restraint with money not their own.
In May 1802, Congress approved $20,000 for “defraying the contingent expenses of government.” By the end of that year, the President reported a single expenditure of $1,440, to return to the United States 72 American seamen stranded abroad. The balance in that fund stood at $18,560.

A year later, the President reported again to Congress on the status of that fund. He had “no occasion” in 1803 to use any part of it. The full balance of $18,560 remained in the nation’s treasury.

“Thank you for your excellent presentation
to the MPUA Annual Conference earlier this month.”
President, CEO & General Manager, Missouri Public Utility Alliance
Mr. Jefferson will provide an excellent presentation for your audience!
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Liars gotta lie. Ignore them. I do.

the uniform tenor of a man’s life furnishes better evidence of what he has said or done on any particular occasion than the word of an enemy … [who] prefers the use of falsehoods which suit him to truths which do not … to divide those by lying tales whom truths cannot divide, is the hackneyed policy of the gossips of every society. our business is to march straight forward,1 to the object which has occupied us for eight & twenty years, without, either, turning to the right or left.
To George Clinton, December 31, 1803

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Confident leaders give no thought to lies spread about others (or themselves).
New York Governor Clinton wrote to the President, disavowing printed allegations that he enclosed, which questioned his loyalty to the administration. Jefferson told him to ignore it. He considered “the uniform tenor of a man’s life” as the proper measurement of that man, not conduct alleged in a specific instance. Gossips always used lies in trying to divide those united in the truth.

The business of his administration was to pursue a straight course, upholding the republican (small r) principles established in 1776, and not be distracted those who had other agendas.

Jefferson replaced Vice-President Aaron Burr with Governor Clinton in 1804.

“… thanks for your excellent program …
I have received nothing but compliments … “
Past President, Cole County Historical Society
Compliments are a natural consequence following Mr. Jefferson’s presentations.
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Make love (dispassionately), not war.

That nations should, in friendship & harmony, take liberal & dispassionate views of their interfering interests, and settle them by timely arrangements, of advantage to both undiminished by injuries to either, is certainly wiser than to yield to short-sighted passions, which, estimating neither chances nor consequences, prompt to measures of mutual destruction, rather than of mutual benefit.
To the Mississippi Territory Legislative Council, December 29, 1803

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Diplomatic leaders trump undiplomatic ones.
The President acknowledged the Council’s congratulatory message on the peaceful addition of Louisiana, an achievement it called second only to our 1776 independence. In this long, run-on sentence, Jefferson expressed the highest goals for international diplomacy, that nations should:
1. Proceed from a basis of friendship
2. Look for the best in the other nation’s motivation
3. Even in disagreement, keep emotion out of it
4. Take time to settle issues in advance of a crisis
5. Seek solutions that will benefit both and hurt neither

These principles guided Jefferson in his negotiations with France over open navigation on the Mississippi River. He contrasted them with the “short sighted passions” of his political opponents, who wanted war rather than diplomacy.

“It was a pleasure to have you perform as Thomas Jefferson.
Feedback from our convention participants … was very positive.”
Executive Director, Association of Partners for Public Lands
Your audience will regard Mr. Jefferson’s presentation as most positive!
Invite him to speak. Call 573-657-2739
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Is he sober, careful, honest, diligent, nearby & republican?

Candidates for the office of Keeper of the Light house at Smith’s point

William Mountague. owns the land adjacent, an Antirepublican therefore inadmissible.
Lancelot L. Edwards. lives near Smith’s Point … is he republican? is he sober? and careful & stationary at his residence?
Thomas Robinson. lives near the place … an old sea-captain … same questions as respecting Edwards
Joseph Jones Monroe … he was known to me about half a dozen years ago. he is republican. I did not think him then a careful man, & the nature of his business (a lawyer) made him not stationary.
Wm. Nelms. lives ¾ of a mile off … republican, honest and diligent. is he also sober?
To Albert Gallatin, December 29, 1803

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Smart leaders frame the issue then delegate the decision.
The Smith’s Point lighthouse, built in 1802 in the Virginia waters of the Chesapeake Bay, needed a keeper. The President sent five names to his Treasury Secretary and the questions to be answered about each. Qualifications should be:
1. Did he live nearby and would he remain there?
2. Was he a political opponent or friend?
3. Was he honest, reliable, and diligent?
4. Was he sober?

As to being “republican,” Jefferson had these guidelines:
1. He would not appoint anyone who was an active political opponent, an “Antirepublican,” like Montague.
2. Since all appointments prior to 1801 had been Federalists, he looked for opportunities to appoint republicans, for both patronage and political balance.
3. For most appointments, political orientation was not a determing factor, so long as the candidate was not vocal in opposition to the republican cause.

The President’s preference was for Robinson. Jefferson referenced a “Dr. Jones” who knew all five. He asked Gallatin to confer with Jones and make a choice. Gallatin chose Nelms.

“We appreciate your sharing your expertise …
It has been a pleasure working with you.”
Director, The Leadership Academy,

Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

Invite Thomas Jefferson to address your audience.
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