Tag Archives: terrorism

Minor issues can showcase major principles.

Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Smith, has recieved his letter of the 3d. inst. and regrets that he could not have the pleasure of seeing him on his passage through the neighborhood … he congratulates mr Smith on the happy termination of our Tripoline war. tho a small war in fact, it is big in principle. it has shewn that when necessary we can be respectable at sea, & has taught to Europe a lesson of honor & of justice to the Barbarians …
To Larkin Smith, September 7, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Perceptive leaders know big results can flow from small actions.
An illness had prevented Smith from visiting Monticello when he was nearby. He wrote to express his regrets. Jefferson answered Smith’s letter, invited him to come another time, and congratulated him on America’s naval success against the Barbary pirates of North Africa.

It was “a small war,” Jefferson acknowledged, but “big in principle.”
1. It proved America could fight and win at sea.
2. The nations of Europe had paid tribute to the pirates for decades. America’s refusal to do so had taught them “a lesson of honor.”
3. The pirates (he called them “Barbarians”) had received a lesson about justice.

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What will herding cats do to you? Part 3

They [the Algerines] have taken two of our vessels, and I fear will ask such a tribute for a forbearance of their piracies as the U.S. would be unwilling to pay. When this idea comes across my mind, my faculties are absolutely suspended between indignation and impotence.
To Nathanael Greene, Jan. 12, 1785

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Herding cats is hard on leaders.
Jefferson was trying both to promote American trade with European nations and recruit those nations to combat the Barbary pirates. Those city-states on the North Africa coast had preyed on other nations’ ships in the Mediterranean for centuries. The action of those pirates worked against his efforts to increase trade.
He had reached an accommodation with the Moroccans, who had seized an American ship. He feared he would not be as successful with the Algerians. The price they would demand for two ships and their crews would be more than the U.S. government would pay. What was he to do?
I’ve always loved the line he used to describe his impossible situation, that his mind was “absolutely suspended between indignation and impotence.”
That’s what herding cats can do to you. It  leaves you both frustrated and incapable of fixing the problem.

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Thomas Jefferson on acts of tyranny

Are terrorism and slavery connected?
Single acts of tyranny may be ascribed to the accidental opinion of a day; but a series of oppressions, begun at a distinguished period, and pursued unalterably through every change of ministers, too plainly prove a deliberate, systematical plan of reducing us to slavery.
Rights of British America, 1774, 8642

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
The full title of this document, published as a brochure, was Summary View of the Rights of British America. It is more commonly called Summary View.
Summary View
is much longer than the Declaration of Independence which followed two years later but laid the groundwork for it. It outlined the rights and privileges of loyal British citizens, which most Americans considered themselves to be in 1774. Summary View also brought to public awareness the young lawyer from Virginia and his skill with the written word.
Although written for the delegates to the First Continental Congress about England, its king and their offenses toward the American colonies, it has relevance today. Just yesterday marked the 10th anniversary of the Al-Qaeda attacks on America. September 11 wasn’t a single offense, and it wasn’t their first one, but it certainly was the most noticeable act, a watershed in its an ongoing campaign “of reducing us to slavery.”

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