Tag Archives: Wall of separation

Hands off God, again. Part 6

In matters of Religion, I have considered that it’s free exercise is placed by the constitution independant of the powers of the general government. I have therefore undertaken, on no occasion, to prescribe the religious exercises suited to it: but have left them, as the constitution found them, under the direction & discipline of the state or church authorities acknoleged by the several religious societies.
Second Inaugural Address, March 4, 1805

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Strict constructionist leaders take the Constitution at its word.
This single paragraph in its entirety sums up Thomas Jefferson’s views on the national government’s role in religion:
1. The Constitution set religion apart as independent of that government.
2. Accordingly, he authorized no national days of prayer, fasting or thanksgiving.
3. Religious observances were left to state or church authorities.

The word “again” appears in this headline, referencing a 2013 post with the same subject and title.

“You put a great amount of effort into this talk …
a lot of research into medical practice in the 18th century.”
Clinical Laboratory Management Association, Central New York Chapter
Mr. Jefferson goes to great lengths to be relevant to your audience.
Invite him to speak. Call 573-657-273
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Since I have to do it, I will make it count!

Averse to recieve addresses, yet unable to prevent them, I have generally endeavored to turn them to some account, by making them the occasion by way of answer, of sowing useful truths & principles among the people, which might germinate and become rooted among their political tenets.
To Levi Lincoln, January 1, 1802

Patrick Lee’s Explanation
Astute leaders turn duties they don’t like into opportunities to teach.
Jefferson had just received on the same day a 700 pound cheese from the Cheshire Baptists of Massachusetts and an address (a written declaration, often stating a position or making a request) from the Danbury Baptists of Connecticut and New York. The latter protested that their religious practices were given as privileges, not rights, by their state government, whose official church was Congregational.

Jefferson’s reply has been embraced by opposing camps as support for their position on religion and government. It contained those famous words, “a wall of separation between Church & State.”

Jefferson disliked addresses in general but felt duty-bound to respond. Thus, he would use the unwished-for task as a opportunity to “sow useful truths & principles among the people …” The point he wanted to make will be the subject of the next post.

The President included a draft of his response to the Danbury folks with this letter and asked Lincoln’s comments.

“I have now hired you three times to present your characters to my annual conference …
Each brought value and a unique, inspiring message to our group.”
Executive Director, National Coal Transportation Association
For a valuable, unique and inspiring message, Thomas Jefferson is your man!
Invite him to speak. Call 573-657-2739
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